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LIZZIE BORDEN PRELIMINARY HEARING – PART 1

 NOTE:  I’M POSTING THIS IN 4 PARTS.

PrelimHearing
The Preliminary Hearing was made available by me in early 2001 when designed and produced as seen above. The source document used was purchased from the Fall River Historical Society who sell unbound sheets of photocopies of this document. Their source was the copy once owned by Andrew J. Jennings, Lizzie’s attorney, which contained his handwritten notes written on back of the pages or on the margins. The hardbound copy I created, illustrated above, includes those handwritten notes. The electronic copy  which I transcribed into WORD in 2001 and is presented here,does not.

I have sold this on eBay many times for the past 13 years and although Stefani Koorey claims it is *her* work, it is not.  Harry Widdows (now deceased) also transcribed the Preliminary Hearing, but as I make no claim of his work, neither can Ms. Koorey of mine.

This post allows you do a cut and paste or copy and save for your own future reference.  If you copy and save to a WORD document, you can do word searches.   It is insightful reading as memories were fresh, unlike the Trial proceedings ten months later.

Faye Musselman © 2001 All rights reserved.

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PRELIMINARY HEARING

STENOGRAPHER’S MINUTES
VOLUMES I – V

COMMONWEALTH
VS.
LIZZIE A. BORDEN

Thursday, August 25, 1892
Thru
Thursday, September 1, 1892

Judge Josiah Coleman Blaisdell, presiding
Second District Court
Fall River, MA.

Annie M. White, Stenographer
New Bedford, Mass
Created by Faye Musselman  2001

PRELIMINARY HEARING

STENOGRAPHER’S MINUTES

VOLUME I

COMMONWEALTH (Mr. Knowlton)
vs.
LIZZIE A. BORDEN  (Mr. Adams, Mr. Jennings)

WITNESSES Direct Cross Re-Direct Re-Cross

Abram G. Hart 203
John T. Burrell 204
Everett Cook 205 206
Charles C. Cook 206
Caroline Kelley 208 210
Jonathon Clegg 212 213
John Cunningham 215 216
Francis H. Wixon 220 223
Joseph Shortsleeves 230
James Mather 231 232
John V. Morse 235 246 262 263
Adelaide B. Churchill 270 279

Annie M. White, Stenographer
New Bedford, Mass

Page 1
BRIDGET SULLIVAN

Q. (Mr. Knowlton) Your name is Bridget Sullivan?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you go by the name of Maggie usually at the house?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. So if anybody says anything about Maggie, it means you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You were employed at Mr. Borden’s house?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How long had you been employed there?
A. About two years and nine months.
Q. What were your duties?
A. Well, I done the washing and ironing and cooking.
Q. Anything else besides that?
A. A little sweeping and scrubbing.
Q. Which part of the house did you have the sweeping of?
A. I had the front hall to do, the front entry.
Q. What days did you sweep the front hall?
A. Every other week, Friday.
Q. Only once in two weeks?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you have any other duties in the front part of the house, except sweeping the front hall?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you have the care of any of the beds?
A. No Sir.
Q. None of them at all?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you have any duties in any of the bed rooms up stairs?
A. No Sir.
Q. At the time of the tragedy, Miss Sullivan, Miss Emma, was she at hope?
A. No Sir.
Q. How long had she been away, about? I dont care for a day or two.
A. I guess she was two weeks. I can’t exactly tell.
Q. She was out of town you understood?
A. That is what I understood.
Q. She had not been in town, so far as you knew, for that time?
A. No Sir.

Page 2
Q. When she was gone, who did the family consist of? Who was left for the family? Who was the family then?
A. Mr. and Mrs. Borden, and Miss Lizzie. Miss Lizzie went with her the day she went.
Q. She did not stay long? How long did she stay?
A. I guess she stayed three days, so far as I can remember.
Q. When she came back, did she go off again?
A. No Sir.
Q. She stayed there all the time. Do you know when Mr. Morse came?
A. He came there a Wednesday.
Q. When did you first see him?
A. I think it was, about, pretty near two o’clock, or half past one.
Q. In the afternoon?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You got him some dinner?
A. Mrs. Borden waited on him, and got him some dinner.
Q. When did you see Mr. Morse again?
A. I saw him going out in the afternoon.
Q. Do you mean walking out?
A. Going out, and going over the River, as I understood.
Q. You understood he was going over the River?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You stayed at home that afternoon, did you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see him when he came home that night?
A. No Sir.
Q. He was not at supper then?
A. No Sir.
Q. Who was at supper that night?
A. Miss Lizzie, and Mr. and Mrs. Borden.
Q. He was not at supper?
A. No Sir.
Q. That was Wednesday night?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. He was not at dinner with the rest of them?
A. No Sir.
Q. What time did you get up Thursday morning?
A. Quarter past six I should judge I was down stairs.
Q. Did you see anybody yelse down there when you came down?
A. No Sir.
Q. What time did you go to bed the night before?
A. After ten o’clock.
Q. Did you have anything to do with shutting up the doors when you went to bed, or any of them?
A. Not except the back door, I locked that, had a key for it, when I got in.
Page 3
Q. You mean the wooden door, not the screen.
A. I had to come through the screen door.
Q. Which did you lock?
A. Both doors.
Q. How was the screen door locked?
A. A bolt.
Q. How the wooden door?
A. There was a fastener to it.
Q. You did not have anything to do with the front door?
A. No Sir.
Q. When you came down stairs in the morning, how did you find the back door?
A. Just as I left it.
Q. What did you do when you came down, about the door?
A. Started my fire.
Q. Did you open either of the doors?
A. The back doors.
Q. Both of them?
A. Yes Sir, and took in my milk can.
Q. The milk can was outside?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. After you took in the milk can, did you do anything to the screen door?
A. Hooked the door.
Q. Did you shut the wooden door up again?
A. No Sir.
Q. Left that open?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that kept open all day?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That was the habit at that time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How was the screen door kept at that time?
A. About quarter of seven I opened it for the ice man to come in.
Q. When you opened it, did you unhook it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. After the ice man came in, did you hook it again?
A. I cant say, I dont remember.
Q. Do you know how that was usually kept, that screen door, hooked or not?
A. It was hooked most of the time. I kept it hooked as far as I could know about it.
Q. Did anybodyelse come in at the back door, that you know of, that morning, besides the ice man, and your going out to get the milk, and coming in?
A. I do not remember.
Q. You mean you do not remember of anybody else, or whether there was

Page 4

anybody else?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where was your milk can?
A. Right on the back steps.
Q. Do I understand you to say whether you do not remember of anybodyelse coming in?
A. Not out of the house. I supposed the others were in the house. I cannot remember when they went or came.
Q. You saw Mr. Morse go out?
A. No Sir. Mr. Borden went out after he got down stairs.
Q. Before Mr. Borden went out, do you recollect seeing anybodyelse go out or in, besides the ice man, and when you went out yourself?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you go out of doors that morning again before Mr. Borden went out?
A. No Sir.
Q. You went out after the milk can on the steps?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you go through the screen door again after that?
A. No Sir.
Q. About quarter past six you got up?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see anybody up when you came down?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you see anybody in the house when you came down?
A. No Sir.
Q. Or hear anybody?
A. No Sir.
Q. Who was the first one you saw that morning?
A. Mrs. Borden.
Q. How soon after you got up before you saw Mrs. Borden?
A. About half past six, or twenty minutes of seven. She came down stairs from her bed room, and into the kitchen.
Q. The back stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Her room was where?
A. Over the kitchen.
Q. From Mr. Borden’s room too, of course?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you know how the arrangement of that house was, whether it was usual to go through— was there any way of going from the back stairs to the front part of the house?
A. I dont know anything about it; but there was a door there; I do not know whether it was kept locked or not.
Q. Where was that?
A. The door going from Mr. Borden’s room into Miss Lizzie’s.

Page 5
Q. You had to go through that door?
A. The door was there. I went through the afternoon of the murder.
Q. After the murder, it was open then?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you ever see it open before?
A. No. I did not have any business there before.
Q. You did not have occasion to go up there?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you ever know of anybody before the murder going up the back way into the front part, or going up the front way into the back part?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did Miss Lizzie ever use the back stairs to go to her room by?
A. I never knew her too.
Q. Did Mr. or Mrs. Borden ever use the front stairs to go to their room?
A. I never saw them.
Q. You saw Mrs. Borden when she came down the back stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What were you doing when she came down?
A. I was getting breakfast.
Q. Was that before or after the ice man came?
A. Before.
Q. What did she do after she got down?
A. She asked me what I had for breakfast. I told her what I had. She told me what to get.
Q. Did she go to doing anything?
A. She went in the sitting room.
Q. Do you know what she did in there?
A. I could not tell.
Q. You did not go in there with her?
A. No Sir.
Q. Who was the next one you saw of the family, after Mrs. Borden?
A. Mr. Borden.
Q. How soon after her did you see him?
A. It may be ten minutes after her, he came down the back way.
Q. What did he do when he came down?
A. I think he went in the sitting room; I am not sure.
Q. He did not go out of doors?
A. He went out of doors before breakfast.
Q. Where did he go out of doors, do you know?
A. Out in the yard from the back door.
Q. How long did he stay out in the yard?
A. I could not tell.
Q. Did anybody go out with him when he went out?
A. No sir.

Page 6
Q. You did not see where he went in the back yard either?
A. He went in the barn and got some water.
Q. Is there a faucet in the barn?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. City water?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did he do with the water?
A. Took a slop pail out and threw it all over the yard.
Q. You mean he emptied some slops?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Wherebouts did he empty the slops?
A. Right out in the yard.
Q. Then drew some water into the pail?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How long was he gone?
A. I could not tell.
Q. Any longer than time enough to do that?
A. I dont think so.
Q. He was not gone any longer than that?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where were you when he went out in the yard?
A. In the kitchen.
Q. All the time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was the door from the kitchen to the back entry open?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You said you did not shut the wooden door afterwards again at all?
A. No Sir.
Q. After he came in with his pail, what did he do then?
A. He washed, and got ready for breakfast.
Q. Washed where?
A. In the kitchen.
Q. He washed in the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was he dressed when he came down?
A. In his shirt sleeves.
Q. Have his coat with him?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did he put his coat on?
A. No Sir. He had his dressing coat, a short coat, hanging in the kitchen.
Q. He put it on there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did he have his collar and neck tie on when he came down?
A. No Sir.

Page 7
Q. Did he put those on?
A. No Sir.
Q. Not for breakfast?
A. No Sir.
Q. When did he put them on?
A. After breakfast I think. He went up stairs to his room.
Q. Did you see Mr. Morse before breakfast?
A. Not until I put the breakfast on the table. I saw him at the breakfast table first.
Q. That was the first time you saw him?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you have for breakfast that morning?
A. Some cold mutton and some soup, and johnny cakes.
Q. Coffee or tea?
A. Coffee.
Q. Who sat down to breakfast?
A. Mr. and Mrs. Borden and Mr. Morse.
Q. Could you tell what time it was they sat down to breakfast?
A. Not exactly. I should judge it was quarter past seven.
Q. What was the usual time of eating breakfast in that family?
A. Mr. and Mrs. Borden always ate when it was ready, when they were down.
Q. You think it was quarter past seven when they sat down?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. They all three sat down together?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where were you when they were eating breakfast?
A. Out in the kitchen.
Q. Did you stay in the kitchen the most of the time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. After breakfast, what took place, do you remember?
A. I took my breakfast, and then cleared off the table, and was washing my dishes.
Q. You were working in the kitchen all the time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What were they doing?
A. I dont know. They were in the sitting room.
Q. All of them?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Mrs. Borden, did you see her doing anything?
A. No Sir.
Q. You saw Mr. Morse go out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Who let him out?
A. Mr. Borden.
Q. How long after breakfast was that?
A. I should judge quarter of nine. I cant tell the exact time.
Page 8

Q. Which door did he let him out of?
A. The back door.
Q. Where were you when he let him out?
A. Mr. Borden let him out; I was still in the kitchen.
Q. Do you know whether he hooked the door after he went out or not, whether Mr. Borden did?
A. I do not know. I could not tell.
Q. What did Mr. Borden do after he let Mr. Morse out?
A. Went into the sitting room back again.
Q. Was that before he had put on his collar and neck tie? He had not done that then?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where was Mrs. Borden when Mr. Morse was let out?
A. She was not in the dining room. I expect she was in the sitting room.
Q. Did you see her afterwards?
A. I did about nine o’clock.
Q. After Morse had gone?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that before Mr. Borden went?
A. Mr. Borden was gone then.
Q. About what time did Mr. Borden go out?
A. I did not see him go out.
Q. Where were you when he went out?
A. I did not see him going, not to my memory.
Q. You do not know where you were?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you go down cellar?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did Mr. Borden go out when Mr. Morse did?
A. No Sir.
Q. He went to the door?
A. Yes Sir, with him.
Q. Did you hear him say anything to Mr. Morse?
A. I heard him ask him to come to dinner.
Q. What did Mr. Morse say?
A. I do not know.
Q. That is when they were at the door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. After Mr. Borden had let Mr. Morse out, where did he go then?
A. The sitting room.
Q. You do not know what he did?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did he go up stairs after that?
A. He came out in the kitchen and cleaned his teeth, and then went up stairs.

Page 9

Q. Up the back stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That was after Morse went; sometime afterwards, or not long?
A. Not very long.
Q. How long was he gone up stairs?
A. I could not tell.
Q. Was that the time he came down with his collar and neck tie on?
A. He put his collar and tie on up stairs.
Q. And came down with them on?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did he do anything about his coat when he came down that time?
A. I did not see him. He went in the sitting room.
Q. Where did he keep the coat that he wore out of doors?
A. In the dining room.
Q. Did you see him with that on?
A. No Sir.
Q. So the last time you saw him before he went out, he had his house coat on?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You say you did not see him go out?
A. No Sir.
Q. You do not know who let him out, or whether he went out the back way or not?
A. I do not know.
Q. Did you go out of the kitchen anywhere?
A. I was out in the back yard.
Q. What were you doing out there?
A. I was out in the back yard; I was not feeling very well, and I was out there.
Q. How long did you stay out there?
A. I might be out there ten or fifteen minutes.
Q. Were you at the water closet?
A. No Sir.
Q. I do not want to ask you any questions you do not want to answer about it.
A. I was sick to my stomach, and was out in the yard, and I was vomiting.
Q. Where in the yard were you?
A. Out near the pear tree.
Q. You went out there to vomit?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you know whether Mr. Morse went off at that time or not?
A. He was gone off then.
Q. How do you know?
A. I know he was.
Page 10

Q. When you came back, did you see Mrs. Borden?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you see her after you came back?
A. Not until nine o’clock.
Q. When you went out in the back yard, was it before Mr. Morse went off?
A. No Sir, after he went off.
Q. How soon after he went off?
A. Maybe ten or five minutes; I cannot tell.
Q. When you came back again, where did you go then?
A. Into the kitchen.
Q. Where did you see Mrs. Borden after that?
A. After washing my dishes.
Q. Did you wash your dishes before you went out in the yard sick, or after you came back?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you saw Mrs. Borden, where did you see her?
A. In the dining room, dusting. She wanted to know if I had anything particular to do that day. I told her no. Did she want anything? Yes, she said she wanted the windows washed. I asked her how. She said on
both sides, inside and outside; they were very dirty.
Q. Did you have any usual time to wash the windows?
A. No Sir.
Q. How often did you use to wash them?
A. Sometimes once a month, and probably twice a month.
Q. Did you see Mrs. Borden after that?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where did she go to then?
A. I could not tell you. I came out, and shut the dining room, and was in the kitchen.
Q. You shut the dining room door and went in the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When did you next see her after that?
A. Not until I saw her dead.
Q. That was the last time you saw Mrs. Borden?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that before Lizzie came down?
A. No. Lizzie was after getting through her breakfast then.
Q. When Mrs. Borden spoke to you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you saw Mrs. Borden, and had that talk with her, Lizzie was out in the kitchen eating her breakfast?
A. She was through her breakfast. She was not in the kitchen.
Q. Where was she?
A. I do not know.
Q. You had seen Lizzie before then?
A. Yes Sir, before that, when she came down stairs.

Page 11
Q. Did Lizzie come down stairs before you went out in the yard to vomit?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where was Lizzie when you went out in the yard?
A. Eating on the kitchen table.
Q. When you came back was she still in the kitchen?
A. I left her in the kitchen when I went out in the yard.
Q. When you came back, you do not remember whether she was there or not?
A. No Sir.
Q. When Lizzie came down did she have anything to say?
A. I asked her what did she want for breakfast. She did not know, she did not want any. If she felt like eating something, she would have some coffee and cookies.
Q. About what time was that?
A. I dont know what time it was. I could not tell.
Q. When Mrs. Borden said that to you about washing windows, do you know where Lizzie was then?
A. No Sir.
Q. That was the last time you saw Mrs. Borden?
A. Yes Sir. She had the feather duster in her hand dusting the dining room. I left her there, and went back into the kitchen.
Q. When you went back into the kitchen, did you see Lizzie?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was she in the kitchen or dining room?
A. No Sir. I did not see her.
Q. You did not go in the sitting room then?
A. No Sir.
Q. You do not know whether she was in the sitting room or not?
A. No Sir.
Q. That was the last you saw of Mrs. Borden?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where she went after that, you do not know?
A. No Sir.
Q. That was after both men had gone?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you came in from vomiting, did you hook the screen door then?
A. I could not tell. I do not know whether I did or not.
Q. Did you usually hook the door?
A. Yes. I always had a habit of hooking the door. I do not know whether I did it that day or not. I cannot tell.
Q. Did you shut the door into the kitchen when you left Mrs. Borden in the dining room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. At that time you did not see Lizzie, and do not know where Lizzie was?
A. No Sir.

Page 12
Q. What did you do then?
A. I cleaned up my kitchen, and straightened up things.
Q. Then what did you do?
A. Washed the windows.
Q. What preparation did you make about washing the windows?
A. I went down cellar and got a pail, and came up, and got a brush out of the closet, and went out to the barn and got a stick.
Q. You went down cellar and got a pail?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Went into the closet?
A. And got a big brush that sticks in the handle.
Q. And out where?
A. Out in the barn to get the stick.
Q. When you started to go out in the barn, do you remember how you found the door then?
A. Miss Lizzie came through the kitchen then, as I started to go out in the barn with a pail. She was at
the back door.
Q. You had the pail?
A. Yes. I was outside. She was at the back door. She wanted to know if I was to wash windows. I said
yes. I told her she need not hook the door, for I would be around there; but I told her she could hook it if she wanted to, and I would get the water in the barn.
Q. Where was she standing at that time?
A. In the back entry.
Q. Had she said anything about hooking the door?
A. No Sir.
Q. How came you to say that to her?
A. I thought she might hook it, and I could not get in. She was standing in the back entry then.
Q. How near the screen door was she then?
A. Pretty near it; not very far from it.
Q. Was you going out to get your pail then, or handle.
A. The handle.
Q. What did you say you said about getting the water?
A. I said I would get the water in the barn.
Q. What did she say?
A. Nothing.
Q. When you started to go out, to go through the screen door, was it hooked then?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had to unhook it to go out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Who was the last person out of that, before that, that you know of?
A. I could not tell.
Q. Had you been down cellar before that morning, before you went to get the pail?
A. I went down after some coal that morning, and some wood to start the fire with.

Page 13
Q. That was one trip?
A. No, I went down first for the wood, and took the ashes down, and brought the wood, and went for
the coal.
Q. Did you use the water closet down cellar that morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. The next time you went down to the cellar was when you went down to get the pail?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you get the water in the barn?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Have you any idea how long that was after Mrs. Borden told you to wash the windows?
A. Half and hour I should judge.
Q. During that half hour you were engaged in cleaning up your kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What was Miss Lizzie doing?
A. I could not tell.
Q. Did you see her during that time?
A. I do not think I did, not to my memory.
Q. When was the next time you saw her after going out to vomit, then you left her in the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir, eating breakfast.
Q. When was the next time you saw her, was it when she came to the screen door, and you were outside?
A. Yes Sir, to my memory.
Q. During the meantime you had not seen her?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where she was, you do not know?
A. No Sir.
Q. Had anything been said by either her or Mrs. Borden, in your presence, about doing up the spare room?
A. No Sir.
Q. Or doing the work in the spare room?
A. No Sir.
Q. You had nothing to do with the work in the spare room?
A. No Sir.
Q. Do you know who did do the work in the spare room?
A. I did not know as Mrs. Borden ever done it before, excepting her own friends were there.
Q. Whether she did it that morning, you dont know?
A. No Sir.
Q. So the next time you saw Lizzie after she was eating breakfast was when you were out in the yard. Where were you when you saw her? You saw her eating whatever breakfast she ate in the kitchen?
A. I went out in the back yard, and left her in the kitchen. Then I
Page 14
next saw her when I started to wash the windows; I was outside the screen door.
Q. Had you got the stick then?
A. No Sir. I had the pail and brush and was just outside the screen door.
Q. What did you say to her about the door?
A. She asked me if I was to wash windows. I says “yes. You no need to lock the screen door. I will bearound here. You may lock it if you want to. I will get the water in the barn.” She did not say anything to that.
Q. Did she stay there to the screen door, or go away from it?
A. I do not know what she done. I went into the barn.
Q. When you came out of the barn, did you see her?
A. No Sir.
Q. How many windows outside did you wash?
A. Six.
Q. Which?
A. The sitting room, two, and the parlor and the dining room.
Q. You were on both sides of the house then?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You were also on the front side of the house too?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How many windows in the parlor?
A. Two.
Q. One on the front and one on the side?
A. Three, I washed three in the parlor.
Q. One side.
A. Two in the dining room and two in the sitting room.
Q. That is all you did wash outside?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. During the time you were washing windows outside, did you go in the house?
A. Yes Sir, I went in after a dipper.
Q. Where did you go for a dipper?
A. In the sink.
Q. Did you go anywhereelse besides in the sink?
A. No Sir. It was when I got through washing them with the brush.
Q. To throw the water up on to them?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You washed all the five windows with the brush before you began with the dipper?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You did not have a hose, but used the dipper instead?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That was pretty near the end of the job when you went after the dipper?

Page 15
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had been all around with the brush?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Were the windows shut?
A. I shut them before I went out first.
Q. How many did you shut before you first went out, all of them?
A. I think I shut one in the sitting room, and two in the dining room.
Q. Was the other one in the sitting room already shut?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. So when you went out to wash the windows the windows were all shut up?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you were around shutting up the windows, did you see anything of Mrs. Borden or Lizzie?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was that the last thing before you went out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. As soon as you got out, you saw Miss Lizzie at the back screen door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you were going through the dining room or sitting room or parlor—
A. I did not go in the parlor at all.
Q. In the sitting room or dining room you did not see Miss Lizzie or Mrs. Borden?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you go where you could see in the front hall?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you go by the front hall door, or was it shut up?
A. I did not notice.
Q. You did not notice her anywhere, or hear her?
A. No Sir.
Q. That was the last thing you did before you went out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you go in the house before you completed the washing the windows for anythingelse besides thedipper?
A. No Sir.
Q. For that you only went to the sink?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where is the sink, right opposite the screen door?
A. It is the left side of the kitchen, next to the back yard.
Q. That is where the back entry comes out?
A. It is way in the back part of the kitchen.
Q. When you went down cellar to get the pail, which way did you go down?
A. Down the kitchen way inside.

Page 16
Q. Did you use the outside door?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you ever use that outside door?
A. No Sir, not except when I would wash.
Q. When did you wash?
A. I washed Monday and hung them out the Tuesday.
Q. Did you then use the back door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was it open then? I mean the cellar back door, did you use it the day you washed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. And the day you hung the clothes out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Both the same day?
A. I only used it the day I hung them out. I had no business going out the day I washed them, for I did
not hang them out.
Q. You used the cellar door that goes into the yard the day you hung the clothes out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Who opened that door?
A. Myself. I shut it when I got through.
Q. Did you fasten it?
A. Yes Sir, with a bolt inside.
Q. Did you unbolt it again during that week?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you take any notice whether it was unbolted or not?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you try to use it?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you know of anybodies going in or out of that back door any time that week?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you notice it after the murder was committed?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not take any notice of it then?
A. No Sir.
Q. Do you know whether Mr. Borden had anything to do about seeing that the back door was shut up?
A. Yes Sir. He always seen a Monday, or whatever day the clothes would be taken in, that it was
locked; for he always took in the clothes line himself.
Q. And saw that the door was locked?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did he do that on Tuesday?
A. I suppose he did. He always came through to see if it was open.
Q. Did you see him do it on Tuesday?
A. No Sir I did not.
Page 17
Q. You did shut up the door yourself on Tuesday, and locked it by a bolt inside?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Anythingelse besides a bolt?
A. No Sir.
Q. What room did that let into?
A. Into the washroom.
Q. Have you any particular idea how long it took you to wash the windows outside?
A. No. I should think it was twenty minutes past ten when I got in the house.
Q. How do you fix that time?
A. By the way I had the other work to do?
Q. You estimate it by the amount of work you had to do?
A. Yes. I did not look at any time, but I judged by the work I had to do.
Q. Which was the longest part of the job, the doing it with the brush, or swashing the water on with the dipper?
A. With the brush I guess.
Q. That was the longest part of it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Is that a good deal the longest part of the work?
A. It is longer to do it with a brush than with the water.
Q. When you came in and got the dipper, and came out again, you washed, threw the water on the windows to make them clean?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Shut up all the time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where did you get the water that you worked with?
A. In the barn.
Q. There is a faucet there, is there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Have you any idea how many pails of water you used?
A. I dont know.
Q. A good many, or not a great many.
A. I guess a good many.
Q. Both for the brush work and the dipper work?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you remember which side you washed first, the dining room side or the sitting room?
A. The sitting room.
Q. That is not the side the parlor is on?
A. No Sir.
Q. There is only two windows on that side of the house?
A. No Sir.
Q. You washed that side first?
A. Yes Sir.

Page 18
Q. You did not wash the kitchen at all?
A. No Sir, I washed the parlor window first, next to the sitting room, and the dining room last.
Q. Then you did the dipper work the same way?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Went around the sitting room first, and then the parlor, and then the dining room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The windows were shut all the time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then what did you do?
A. I came in and got the hand basin and went in the sitting room and started to wash the sitting room windows inside.
Q. Still shut up, were they?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You went in through the screen door, and shut it up and hooked it when you came in?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Took the hand basin and went to washing the sitting room windows?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you came in at that time, did you see Miss Lizzie?
A. I do not think I did. No Sir, I did not.
Q. So as I understand you, you had not seen her after she came to the back screen door, as you began your work?
A. No Sir, not to my memory.
Q. Where she was, you do not know?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not hear her either?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you see Mrs. Borden when you came inside and began to wash the sitting room windows?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you see any person around the house when you were washing the windows outside?
A. No Sir.
Q. In through the windows, did you see anybody, or did you see anybody in the yard?
A. No Sir.
Q. You say you washed the sitting room windows inside first?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did Mr. Borden come in any time during that time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What stage of the work were you at. How far had you got along with the washing, when he came in?
A. I had part of one window washed, that was the upper part.
Q. The upper part of one window?
A. Yes Sir.
Page 19
Q. That would be quarter of the work in that room, done?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How did you know he had come?
A. I heard him at the door. I cannot tell did he ring the bell or not, but I heard a person at the door trying
to get in; and I let him in.
Q. What was it you heard exactly?
A. Somebody trying to unlock the door.
Q. You was then in the sitting room washing the windows?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you do?
A. I went and let him in.
Q. It was Mr. Borden was it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Have you any idea what time that was?
A. It might be later than half past ten; I could not tell.
Q. What locks on the front door did you find locked when you let him in?
A. The bolt and a common key that I turned on both sides.
Q. Anythingelse?
A. No Sir.
Q. A spring lock?
A. Yes Sir. He had a key.
Q. He unlocked that from the outside?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that spring lock set to lock the door up when it was shut?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Up to the time you let Mr. Borden in, had you seen Miss Lizzie?
A. She was up stairs at the time I let him in.
Q. Where up stairs?
A. She might be in the hall, for I heard her laugh.
Q. Up the back or front stairs?
A. The front stairs.
Q. At the time you let Mr. Borden in?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that the first you had heard or seen of her since you spoke to her at the back door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had not seen her or Mrs. Borden during the intermediate time?
A. No Sir.
Q. What was the occasion of her laugh?
A. I got puzzled on the door, I said something, and she laughed at it; I supposed that must make her laugh, I dont know.
Q. She laughed when you said something?
A. Yes Sir. I did not expect the door was locked. I went to open it. I was puzzled; I went to unlock it twice.
Q. What was it you said, if it is not too bad to repeat?
A. No. I did not say much.

Page 20
Q. Some exclamation you made when you had trouble with the door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that the time she laughed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did she laugh out loud?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Say anything?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you see her then?
A. No Sir.
Q. How soon did you see her?
A. It might be five or ten minutes after she came down stairs; she came through the front hall, I don’t know whether she came from up stairs. She came through the sitting room, I was in the sitting room.
Q. Where did Mr. Borden go when he came in?
A. Into the dining room.
Q. You were at work in the sitting room then?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did he do in the dining room?
A. He sat at the head of the lounge in a chair when I saw him.
Q. There is a lounge in the dining room too?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That is not the lounge he was found dead on?
A. No Sir.
Q. He sat in a chair? What doing?
A. Reading.
Q. You were still at work in the sitting room, washing the windows?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Had you finished washing the sitting room windows when she came down?
A. No Sir.
Q. You were still engaged in washing the windows?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see her when you let Mr. Borden in, or only hear her?
A. No Sir, heard her.
Q. When she came down, what room did she come into from the front hall?
A. In the sitting room where I was; then she went into the dining room.
Q. That is where Mr. Borden was?
A. Yes.
Q. Did you hear her say anything to Mr. Borden?
A. I heard her ask him if he had any mail for her. I heard her telling her father very slowly that her mother got a note, that Mrs. Borden had a note that morning, and had gone out.
Q. You heard her telling that very slowly?

Page 21
A. Yes Sir, to her father.
Q. Had got a note?
A. From some sick person. Of course the conversation was very low, I did not pay any attention to it; but I heard her telling her father that.
Q. What else did you hear her say to her father?
A. Not any more.
Q. What happened then, did she stay there?
A. I do not know where she went then, I cannot tell.
Q. Do you know whether she stayed in that room or not?
A. No Sir, I do not.
Q. What did you do then?
A. I stayed washing the windows, right along until I got through.
Q. In the sitting room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you do then?
A. I came right into the dining room.
Q. Where was Mr. Borden when you came into the dining room?
A. After coming down stairs from his room.
Q. Did you see him go?
A. I saw him take the key from the shelf.
Q. Was that after Miss Lizzie spoke to him?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where did he take the key from?
A. Off the sitting room shelf.
Q. How did he go to go up stairs, which way?
A. The back way.
Q. How long was he gone?
A. I could not tell.
Q. Was you washing windows in the sitting room when he went up the back stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Were you when he came down?
A. I was just taking the step ladder from the sitting room into the dining room.
Q. When you went into the dining room, did you see Miss Lizzie then?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was she in the dining room or sitting room?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you see her in the kitchen?
A. No Sir. I did not go out in the kitchen.
Q. When Mr. Borden went out into the kitchen, you saw him go out?
A. Yes Sir, he came out of the kitchen door, and went back again.
Q. Did you see whether Miss Lizzie went with him then?
A. I did not notice.
Q. You saw Mr. Borden when he came back?
A. Yes Sir.

Page 22
Q. What did he do then when he came back?
A. He let the window down, it was up with the screen in. He took a chair and sat down near the window with a book or paper in his hand.
Q. Which window was that?
A. The sitting room.
Q. Sat in a chair near the window with a book or paper in his hand?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was anybody in the room then?
A. Not as I saw.
Q. You could see?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was it the usual place to keep the key of his room on the shelf in the sitting room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That room was kept locked?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That is the room that lets in from the back stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did he bring the key back when he came back?
A. Yes Sir, and put it on the shelf.
Q. He sat down with a book or a paper near the window in the sitting room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. In a rocking chair?
A. An easy chair I guess.
Q. Had he then put on his house coat?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. What was you doing then?
A. Started to wash the first window in the dining room.
Q. Had you seen Miss Lizzie about then?
A. No Sir.
Q. How soon did you see Miss Lizzie?
A. I was washing the last window, she came out from the sitting room into the kitchen, and brought in an ironing board.
Q. She came from the sitting room through the dining room?
A. Yes Sir, and she went out in the kitchen, and brought in an ironing board, put it on the dining room table and started to iron.
Q. That was while you was finishing the last window?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She appeared then from the sitting room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was the door from the sitting room to the kitchen open then?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Was the door from the dining room to the kitchen open then?
A. She opened it.
Q. She appeared from the sitting room into the dining room, and went into the kitchen, and got the board?

Page 23
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had not seen her before since she came down and asked about the mail?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where she went to meanwhile, you do not know?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where did she put the ironing board?
A. On the dining room table.
Q. Wherebouts did you say she put the ironing board?
A. On the dining room table.
Q. Was the table in the middle of the room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was it set with dishes?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You kept it set all the time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You did not clear it away, and put on a red cloth, or something, but kept it set all the time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did she lay the ironing board right on the table, or from the table to somethingelse?
A. Right on the table.
Q. Which part of the table was that, do you remember now, near the kitchen door, or what?
A. I should say on the corner of the table. She left it on the dining room table.
Q. Which corner of the table?
A. As she came from the kitchen door in, the same side.
Q. Nearest to the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was this a regular sized ironing board?
A. No Sir, a very small one; it was not the one I used to use.
Q. Something specially for this business, I suppose?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Give me a little idea of the size of it. Was it as big as that there?
A. No Sir, as big as that.
Q. In front of you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You did the ironing, I suppose, for the family?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What was this that she was ironing?
A. Handkerchiefs. She always done them herself.
Q. It was just as you was finishing the dining room windows that she brought the ironing board in?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did she say anything to her father then?
A. I did not hear her.
Page 24
Q. Did you hear her father move, or do anything in his room?
A. No Sir, not to my knowledge.
Q. Did you hear him leave the chair he was sitting in, or see him leave the chair?
A. No Sir. I could not have seen him from the first window I started to wash. The door was right facing the window.
Q. Did you see him from that window?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. He was sitting in the chair then?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. It was while you were washing the other window Lizzie appeared, and went into the kitchen, and got her ironing board?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you do then when you finished washing the window?
A. I went out in the kitchen, and Miss Lizzie was talking to me a little while, not very long.
Q. What was she saying?
A. She asked was I going out that afternoon. I told her I did not know, I might, and I might not. I was not feeling very well. She said Mrs. Borden was going out, or gone out. I could not catch the two words she said; that somebody was sick. I asked her who was sick. She said she did not know, but she had a note that morning. “If you go out, be sure and lock the door, because I may be out.”
Q. Did she say anythingelse?
A. No Sir, not in the dining room.
Q. What did you do then?
A. I went out in the kitchen.
Q. She was then in the dining room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you do then?
A. Hung up my cloth I had to wash with, and threw away the water, and went up stairs in my room.
Q. Where was Miss Lizzie?
A. She came out in the kitchen as I was starting to go up stairs.
Q. What for, if you saw?
A. She came out, and she told me there was a sale in Sargeants that afternoon of dress goods for eight cents a yard. I told her I would have one.
Q. Did she say anythingelse to you?
A. No Sir, that was all.
Q. That was before you went up stairs?
A. Yes Sir, just as I was starting.
Q. Was she then having her flats in her hand?
A. I could not tell whether she had her flats or not. She went in the dining room back again.
Q. Did you see her take her flats in her hand before you went up stairs?

Page 25

A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see her with her flats in her hand when you went up stairs?
A. I do not know. She was ironing when I was in the dining room.
Q. How long did you stay in the kitchen?
A. Not more than three or four minutes.
Q. She came out and told you that about the sale, and then you went up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see Mr. Borden again? You said you saw him as you was washing next to the last window
in the dining room, and after you got around the partition you did not see him?
A. No Sir.
Q. If he changed his position from there to the sofa you did not know it?
A. No Sir.
Q. When you went up stairs, what time was it?
A. It might be four or five minutes to eleven.
Q. How do you know that?
A. By the length of time I was up stairs when it struck eleven o’clock.
Q. How soon after you got up stairs did you hear it strike eleven?
A. About three or four minutes.
Q. After you got up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you take any notice of the fact that it struck eleven?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What notice did you take of it?
A. My clock was on the bureau.
Q. Where were you at the time?
A. I was laying on the bed.
Q. You were laying down?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You did not take your clothes off?
A. No Sir.
Q. How long did you say it was after you got up stairs before the clock struck?
A. I should say it was three minutes.
Q. Very soon then?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you go to sleep, so far as you know?
A. No Sir.
Q. Why was you not at work getting your dinner at that time?
A. I thought I had time enough to start to get dinner at half past eleven, with the dinner I had to get.
Q. Was it your habit to go up stairs that way?
Page 26
A Yes Sir.
Q. When?
A. When I got through with my work down stairs, if I had not anythingelse to do, I always went up stairs, before I started to get dinner, if I had time.
Q. How did you leave the fire when you went up stairs?
A. I did not see the fire at all.
Q. When was the last time you had anything to do with the fire?
A. After getting breakfast, and washing my dishes, I did not see the fire again. I had no business with it.
Q. Did you look out the window when you were up stairs, you did not, did you?
A. No Sir.
Q. You lay right on the bed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When were the flats put on the stove, that were used for the ironing?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. They were on the stove?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you know what the dinner was that day?
A. Yes Sir, some soup to warm over, and some cold mutton.
Q. Potatoes?
A. No Sir; potatoes in the soup.
Q. Had you put the soup on when you went up stairs?
A. No Sir.
Q. You were coming down to do that about half past eleven?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Cold mutton, of course, did not require any cooking at all?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not pay any attention to the fire when you went up stairs at all?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was it a coal or wood fire?
A. A little coal fire I started in the morning.
Q. How did you usually warm up the soup with coal or wood?
A. In hot weather, we usually used the wood.
Q. You let the coal fire go out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You were coming down stairs at half past eleven to get the dinner?
A. Yes Sir, probably sooner.
Q. Did Miss Lizzie say anything more to you before you went up stairs besides what you said?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you hear anything down stairs?
A. No Sir.

Page 27
Q. Did you go in or out of the screen door after you came in from washing the windows?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did anybodyelse, so far as you saw?
A. No Sir.
Q. When you came in, you fastened it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. After you let Mr. Borden in, did you shut the front door up again?
A. He shut it up.
Q. When did you next see anything, or hear anything?
A. Not until Miss Lizzie called me.
Q. What time was that, as near as you can fix it?
A. I might be up stairs ten or fifteen minutes, as near as I can think, after I went up stairs.
Q. Have you anyway of fixing that, or is it just your estimation?
A. That is what I think, I did not look at the clock when I came down. That is the length of time I thought I was there.
Q. You were still lying on the bed—
A. Yes Sir.
Q. — when she called to you. What did she say?
A. She holloed to me. Of course I knew something was the matter, she holloed so loud. I asked her what was the matter. She said “come down quick”, that her father was dead.
Q. She called your name, Maggie?
A. Yes Sir. I came down, and asked what was the matter, and was going into the sitting room. She told me to go quick for Dr. Bowen.
Q. Where was she when you went down?
A. Standing in the back door, leaning against it, right by the screen door.
Q. The wooden door, that you opened in the morning, that was not shut during the day?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That was at the foot of the stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The stairs came down near the screen door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did she say anything when you got down stairs?
A. She said “go for Dr. Bowen”. I ran ahead, I did not know what was the matter. She told me to “go quick and get Dr. Bowen.”
Q. What did you do then?
A. I went right over to Dr. Bowen’s.
Q. Who did you find there?
A. Mrs. Bowen.
Q. You told her what had happened?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Dr. Bowen was not there?
A. No Sir.
Q. Then what did you do?
Page 28
A. Came back.
Q. Dr. Bowen lives right across the street?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Who was there when you came back?
A. Nobody but Miss Lizzie. I told her he was not in. I told her what Mrs. Bowen told me. She told me
to go after Miss Russell.
Q. What did you do then?
A. I went after her.
Q. Where does she live?
A. On Borden street.
Q. How far away is that?
A. I do not know, it is a good ways away. I could not tell you exactly how long it is.
Q. Did you find Miss Russell?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Had anybodyelse come in when you came back there, telling that Dr. Bowen was not there?
A. No Sir, I did not see anybody.
Q. Where was Miss Lizzie when you came back from Mrs. Bowen’s?
A. Where I left her, standing at the door.
Q. At that time when you went out after Dr. Bowen, did you find the screen door locked?
A. No Sir.
Q. Shut up?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you come back with Miss Russell?
A. Ahead of her.
Q. When you came back, who did you find there then?
A. Dr. Bowen was ahead of me, he stepped out of his carriage as I came up Second street. Dr. Bowen went in ahead of me.
Q. When you got in, who did you find there?
A. I think Mrs. Churchill was in when I got in there.
Q. She is the next door neighbor?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She was in when you got back?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What was said when you got back?
A. I cannot tell.
Q. Where was Miss Lizzie when you got back?
A. She was there.
Q. Wherebouts?
A. I could not tell you where, I think she must be in the kitchen; I think she was in the kitchen.
Q. Who else was there besides Mrs. Churchill?
A. That is all I remember, Mrs. Churchill and Dr. Bowen.
Q. Did you then see the body?
A. No Sir.
Q. What happened then, what was the next thing you remember. I
Page 29
suppose you got pretty confused by that time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What is the next thing you remember to have taken place?
A. Dr. Bowen said Mr. Borden was murdered, as I went into the dining room.
Q. Did you see anything of the ironing board when you got back?
A. I did not notice it, but afterwards I saw it on the kitchen table.
Q. Where it belonged?
A. No Sir; it belonged in the closet.
Q. Where were the handkerchiefs?
A. I did not notice them.
Q. About how many handkerchiefs did she have to iron?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Did she iron anybodys but her own?
A. That is all.
Q. Did you see the handkerchiefs there when you got back?
A. No Sir, I did not think of them.
Q. Was anything more said then that you remember of?
A. No Sir.
Q. What did you do then?
A. We were talking, I said I would like to know where Mrs. Borden was. I said I would go over to Mrs. Whitehead’s. She said she would like us to search for Mrs. Borden, she told us to go and search for her. I said I would go over there, if I knew where the house was. She said she was positive she heard her coming in, and would not we go up stairs and see.
Q. Who said that?
A. Miss Lizzie Borden. I said I would not go up stairs; and Mrs. Churchill said she was willing to go with me; so me and Mrs. Churchill went up the front stairs. There we found Mrs. Borden.
Q. Did you see her before you got in?
A. I saw her as I went in; but I stood at the foot of the bed and looked at her.
Q. Was the door open then into the room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you disturb or touch the body in any way?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did anybody while you were there?
A. No Sir.
Q. You said you saw her before you went in?
A. Yes Sir, I could see her as I went in. Of course the bed was not a very high bed, I could see her body, her dress; and then I stood at the foot of the bed and looked at her.
Q. What did you do then?
A. I came down stairs.
Q. Did anyone else come by that time?

Page 30
A. No Sir, Mrs. Churchill came with me. I do not know whether she went into the room or not, I cannot tell. Me and her came down stairs and she told Dr. Bowen that Mrs. Borden was up stairs.
Q. Where was Lizzie then?
A. In the kitchen with Miss Russell.
Q. What then?
A. That is all I done there.
Q. Then I suppose the other people came?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see Dr. Dolan when he came?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see what he did when he came?
A. No Sir, I did not go into the rooms any more.
Q. You stayed in the kitchen after that?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you go down cellar?
A. Yes, with some of the officers.
Q. What officers?
A. I could not tell.
Q. Did you see any axes or hatchets in there?
A. Yes Sir in a box back of the furnace where Mr. Borden used to keep the wood.
Q. When you went down this time with the officers, were they there?
A. Yes Sir, They asked me to go down with them.
Q. They were in a box back of the furnace?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that the first time you had seen them?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Had you ever seen them before?
A. No Sir.
Q. Which officers went down?
A. I could not tell you one of them.
Q. You do not see any of them here?
A. I do not think I know any of them now.
Q. Did you see whether the outside cellar door was open then?
A. No Sir I did not.
Q. Did you notice it was, or was not?
A. I did not notice anything about it.
Q. How soon was that after you got back that you went down stairs with the officers?
A. Quite a while I guess.
Q. That was the first time you had seen the axes, when the officers went down?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had not seen the axes that morning before that?
A. No Sir. I had no business to go to that place at all.
Q. You had been down stairs before?
A. Yes Sir.

Page 31
Q. You had not seen any axes before that time?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not notice anything about the cellar door when you went down?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you hear Miss Lizzie say at any time where she was when her father was killed?
A. I asked her where she was. She said she was out in the back yard.
Q. Did she say what she was doing in the back yard?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was anything more said by her excepting that?
A. No Sir, not to me.
Q. In your hearing did you hear her say anything beside that?
A. No Sir.
Q. When did she say that, if you remember?
A. I think after I was getting back from being after Miss Russell.
Q. Do you remember what dress she had on that morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. You have no idea at all?
A. No Sir.
Q. You could not tell whether she had a dress and waist of the same kind, or different?
A. No Sir, nothing about it.
Q. Could you tell whether she had an apron on?
A. I could not tell whether she did or not.
Q. Had Mrs. Borden said anything to you about going out that day?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was it her habit to tell you when she was going out?
(Objected to.) (Court) Your objection is sustained as a matter of course.(Mr. Knowlton) As to whether it was Mrs. Borden’s habit to notify her hen she was going out. Isuppose I could show it was her universal habit to notify this girl when she went out for any errand
whatever. I am going to show she did not this morning.
Q. Had she told you anything about going out that morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. Whether it was her habit?
(Objected to.)
(Court) Excluded.
Q. The only person you have heard anything about going out from, was from Lizzie?
A. Yes Sir.
(Objected to as leading.)

Page 32

(August 27, 1892)

Q. Had there been any sickness in the family before that Thursday that you know of?
A. Yes Sir, they were sick Wednesday.
Q. What time Wednesday did you first know of it?
A. In the morning, as they got down stairs.
Q. Who is “they”?
A. Mr. Borden came down first.
Q. When who got down stairs?
A. Mr. Borden came down first that morning.
Q. What was it about their being sick?
A. Mrs. Borden came down, and asked me if I heard they were sick all night. I said no. She said her and Mr. Borden were sick all night, taken with vomiting.
Q. That you heard Wednesday morning?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How did they appear to be Wednesday morning?
A. They looked pretty sick.
Q. Both of them?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you hear Miss Lizzie say anything about being sick too?
A. Yes Sir.
(Mr. Adams) What did she say?
Q. What, if anything, did you hear Lizzie say?
A. No Sir, I heard her say she was sick all night too.
Q. How did she seem to be in the morning?
A. Well, I did not notice.
Q. When did you get the coal and wood for the day?
A. In the morning when I first start the fire.
Q. What is it you get in the morning?
A. I first got the wood, and started the fire, and then went for the coal.
Q. How do you keep the fire going during the day?
A. Sometimes we keep it going, if there is any necessity for it.
Q. How, with coal or wood?
A. Sometimes with wood, more times with coal.
Q. What kind of wood do you use?
A. Hard wood.
Q. Get it where?
A. Down cellar.
Q. Did you have a wood box up in the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. One or two little things I did not touch on yesterday, that I went over; how long should you say Miss Lizzie had been ironing when you went up stairs?
A. I could not say how long it was.
Q. As near as you can tell?
Page 33
A. Probably about eight or nine minutes.
Q. When you went up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That privy out behind the barn, was that used by any member of the family, was that in use?
A. Mr. Borden used it.
Q. Did anybodyelse besides him?
A. Mrs. Borden sometimes.
Q. Did you ever know the girls to use it?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was there any horse kept there on the premises?
A. Not for the last year.
Q. Formerly was?
A. Yes Sir, there was a horse there once.
Q. When did they leave off keeping a horse, so far as you know about?
A. I should think it was a year or two, I cannot exactly tell the time.
Q. Since that time, has there been any animals kept in the barn?
A. No Sir, not as I know of.
Q. Since the horse left off being kept there, have you ever seen Lizzie go to the barn?
A. No Sir, not that I remember.
Q. Tell me again what you said yesterday about what Lizzie said about receiving a note, about her mother receiving a note.(Mr. Adams) He has already had it; he is not entitled to it again. (Mr. Knowlton) I do not know whether she said yesterday what I am trying to get at or not. (Court) You are entitled to understand the testimony. (Mr. Adams) He does not say that he does not understand it.(Court) The question may be asked.
Q. Tell that again, what Lizzie said to you about her mother’s note.
A. Lizzie Borden asked me that day if I was going out that afternoon. I said I did not know, I might, and I might not. She said “if you go out, be sure and have the doors fastened, I might go out too, and Mrs. Borden may be gone out too. She had a note this morning, a sick call.” I said “who is sick?” She said “she had a note, so it must be in town.”
Q. At any time did you have any talk with Lizzie more than what you stated?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you have any talk about her seeing or hearing Mrs. Borden?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you ask her any questions as to whether she heard anything?
A. No Sir.
Q. Or did she say anything?
A. No Sir.
Q. Calling your attention; whether you had any talk with her, in which she said anything about hearing her groan?
Page 34

(Objected to.)
(Mr. Knowlton) I have exhausted the witness’ recollection, and now direct her attention.
(Court) If it is for the purpose of refreshing her recollection of something which you are confident is within her knowledge, the question may be put in that form.
Q. Yes. Miss Lizzie said she was out in the yard, and she heard a groan.
(Mr. Adams) Heard a groan, or heard her groan?
A. Heard her father groan I should think.
Q. What did you say to her before that?
A. I asked her where she was. She said she was out in the back yard. She heard a groan, and she came in, and the screen door was wide open.
Q. When you were opening the door, the front door, and heard her laugh up stairs, did you recognize the voice?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Whose did you recognize it to be?
A. Miss Lizzie.
Q. At any time after she called you down stairs, did you see Miss Lizzie crying?
A. No Sir.
Q. At no time?
A. No Sir.
Q. That applies to the whole day, that question does.
A. No Sir.

Page 45
Cross-examination of Bridget Sullivan

Q. (Mr. Adams.) Do you want to sit down this morning, Miss Sullivan?
A. No Sir.
Q. I am going to ask you a few questions. Do I understand you to say you lived with this family two years and ten months?
A. Nine months, about.
Q. Two years and nine months?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That is to say, what season of the year was it you came to Mr. Borden’s?
A. Some day in November, I think.
Q. Two years last November?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you come from another place there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Whose place was that?
A. Mrs. Remington’s in High street.
Q. How long had you lived there?
A. Seven months.
Q. Where did you live before that?
A. Mrs. Reed’s in Highland Avenue.
Q. How long did you live there?
A. Fifteen months.
Q. Where before that?
A. Out in South Bethlehem.
Q. Where is that?
A. Pennsylvania.
Q. Then you came from Pennsylvania here to Fall River?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you know anybody in Fall River when you came here?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Have you any friends or relatives here?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. In consequence of that fact you came here?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How long had you lived in So. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania?
A. Twelve months.
Q. Were you at work there in a family?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What doing?
A. House work.
Q. Where did you live before that?
A. Came from Ireland.
Q. Did you land in New York?
A. No Sir, Newport.
Q. You left the steamer at Newport?
Page 46
A. Yes Sir, the New York boat.
Q. You came to New York first, and went from New York to Newport?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That then is five or six years ago, is it not?
A. Six years ago the 24th of last May.
Q. How old are you?
A. Twenty-five.
Q. When was your last birthday?
A. I do not know.
Q. You do not know?
A. No Sir.
Q. Then how do you know you are twenty-five; because you have been informed so?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you ever live anywhere else than in Pennsylvania and Fall River?
A. In Newport I worked twelve months.
Q. In whose family there?
A. A hotel.
Q. What hotel?
A. The Perry house.
Q. That was when you first came to this country?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How long did you stay there?
A. Twelve months.
Q. Did you work anywhere else in Newport than in the Perry House?
A. No Sir.
Q. And you were at work all the time while you were in Newport. While you lived there, in the Perry House?
A. I was a little while with my friends before I went to work. I was twelve months in Newport before I left it.
Q. Friends where?
A. In Newport.
Q. Who were they?
A. Sullivans.
Q. What Sullivan is it, what is the first name?
A. Dennis.
Q. Mr. Dennis Sullivan; does he live there now?
A. I do not know.
Q. Was he a relative of yours?
A. A friend.
Q. A married man?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You stopped in the family?
A. Yes Sir, when I was out of a place.
Q. About how long did you stay in his family before you got the place?
A. I cannot tell.
Q. A week or two weeks or a month?
Page 47
A. Two or three weeks.
Q. A short time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you ever work for a Mr. Saunders, or Landers, any such name as that?
A. No Sir.
Q. What was the name of the family for whom you worked in So. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania?
A. Mr. Smiley.
Q. What was his first name?
A. Mr. Matt Smiley.
Q. Matthew Smiley?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What was his business?
A. I do not know what his business was.
Q. What kind of work did you do in the Perry House at Newport?
A. Kitchen work.
Q. Have you ever testified before in this case?
A. No Sir.
Q. Ever told your story before?
A. What do you mean?
Q. I want you to understand my question, that is, whether or not you have told what you know in this case anywhere before you came into this Court Room?
A. Why, no.
Q. Did you not go before the Inquest? Have you not testified before you began telling your story yesterday?
A. I was here yesterday.
Q. Before that time, did you not tell the story at any time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When was that, how long ago?
A. Tuesday, after the murder, I guess.
Q. Was it in this same room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Who were present, were there any people here?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How many?
A. Three or four I think.
Q. Can you tell me who they were?
A. Mr. Knowlton was there, and the Marshal, I think.
Q. The Marshal was here?
A. I think he was, I do not know.
Q. Was someone here besides Mr. Knowlton, the District Attorney?
A. I think Dr. Dolan was here.
Q. Were they in the room when you were telling your story?
A. I think so.
Q. All the time?
A. I think so.

Page 48
Q. Who else besides Dr. Dolan and the marshal were in the room while you were telling your story?
A. I dont know.
Q. Were there some other people do you think?
A. I dont know. There were three or four folks here, I do not know who they were.
Q. Who asked you the questions?
A. Mr. Knowlton.
Q. Was your story taken down in writing?
A. I think so.
Q. Has any of it been read to you since then?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where did you go when you left the court room last night?
A. I went down in the office to wait for a carriage.
Q. In the marshal’s office?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you have any talk down there?
A. No Sir. Of course there was words passed to me.
Q. Did you have any talk about your testimony then, or later?
A. No Sir.
Q. Since you left the Court Room last night, have you talked with anybody about your testimony?
A. No Sir.
Q. Has it been read to you, or your attention called to any part of it?
A. No Sir, I did not hear anything of it read.
Q. Did anybody have any talk with you; did the District Attorney talk to you last night?
A. Yes Sir, he said a few words to me down in the Marshal’s office.
Q. Was the Marshal there?
A. He was around there, I do not know whether he was listening to me.
Q. Who else was there?
A. I cannot tell who they were.
Q. Did they have any testimony, or anything, written out, or any paper which they showed you last night?
A. Mr. Knowlton showed me a little paper.
Q. What kind of a little paper?
A. I do not know what it was.
Q. Did you look at it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was it in writing?
A. In printing I think.
Q. Was it something that you had said somewhere?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. It was. And had you made some mistake?
A. No Sir.
Page 49
Q. Was it something that you were going to say?
A. No Sir.
Q. Something that you had said at the other hearing?
A. No Sir. What I said was all right.
Q. I understand that. What did he show you the paper for; do you recollect?
A. I do not know.
Q. You read it, did you not?
A. No Sir, I did not.
Q. You saw it was in printing?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. He handed it to you?
A. No Sir.
Q. You said he showed it to you?
A. I said I saw it.
Q. Was he talking about that paper when he showed it to you?
A. No Sir. He read a little of it.
Q. Was that something that you had said?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When had you said it?
A. I do not know when I said it.
Q. Did you say it yesterday or at that other time when you were in this room?
A. I do not know.
Q. Had you said it at all at any time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Had you forgotten all about it?
A. No Sir.
Q. You remembered all about it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How much do you think he read to you, quite a little?
A. About half a dozen words I should judge.
Q. What were those half a dozen words?
A. I dont know.
Q. You dont know?
A. No Sir.
Q. Cant you remember?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did anybodyelse show you any paper?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was anybodyelse there beside the marshal, you say he was around there?
A. No Sir. The marshal was not there with me then.
Q. This was in the Marshal’s room, in the open room there?
A. I was sitting down there in a chair, waiting for a carriage.
Q. Was it in the marshal’s room, the open room there? It was not in a private room, it was in the public room, was it not?

Page 50
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What time did you get home last night?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. You did not stay long down there?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not stay long in the room down stairs?
A. I waited for a carriage, that is all.
Q. I do not know how long you waited for a carriage, you know.
A. I do not know either myself; I did not have no time.
Q. Did you get home to supper?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. About six o’clock?
A. I could not tell; I suppose so.
Q. You did not see anybody after that last evening?
A. No Sir.
Q. Nobodyelse showed you any paper last evening?
A. No Sir.
Q. No one has shown you any paper this morning, or any printing?
A. No Sir.
Q. Or read any half a dozen words to you?
A. No Sir.
Q. Were those words that he read to you last night anything about this groan that you testified to this
morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. How do you know they was not?
A. I know they was not.
Q. I thought you could not remember?
A. Well, they was not about that.
Q. Were they anything about the note?
A. No Sir.
Q. Were they anything about the laugh up stairs?
A. No Sir.
Q. Were they anything about her saying words slowly?
A. No Sir.
Q. Yet you cannot tell us what they were about?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did he ask you any questions about them?
A. No Sir.
Q. Simply read them to you, and said nothing?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The Wednesday night before this murder, you were out of the house?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What door did you go out of?
A. The back door.
Q. That is the north door, the side door?
A. Yes Sir.
Page 51
Q. You slept up stairs in the attic, the back side of the house, overlooking the back yard?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. There are other rooms in the attic?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. All locked up?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Been in the habit of being locked up since you lived there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. These back stairs you went up and down were the same ones Mr. and Mrs. Borden went up and down?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. They were carpeted way down to where the kitchen was?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you went out that night, did you have a key to the back door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You left the screen door unfastened?
A. Yes Sir, but the other door was locked.
Q. You always had a key to that door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. For how long?
A. I dont think I have had it quite a year yet.
Q. Did anybody come home with you that night?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did anybody come to the gate with you?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you meet anybody in particular in the street?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you have any visitors?
A. Sometimes.
Q. Did you have any men call on you?
A. No Sir.
Q. Ever since you have been at this house?
A. Not in Fall River.
Q. While you have been in this house?
A. Not anybody from Fall River.
Q. I did not ask you where they were from. When did you have anybody call on you, not from Fall River?
A. About two or three months before that I guess.
Q. That is the last time any man has called on you at the house?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Has any man walked home with you?
A. No Sir.
Q. Has any man seen you in the back yard?
A. No Sir.
Q. Have you met anybody in the back yard for the last two or three months?
A. No Sir.

Page 52
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you ever meet anybody in the back yard?
A. No Sir.
Q. Or sit down with anybody on the back step, or in the back yard?
A. No Sir.
Q. Never in your life?
A. I have sat down with girls on the back stairs and in the kitchen.
Q. Have you ever sat out on the back side of the house, or in the yard with girls?
A. No Sir.
Q. Or with anybody?
A. No Sir.
Q. Wednesday night you came in about what time?
A. About five minutes past ten.
Q. Everybody had gone to bed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you lock the door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you get a lamp?
A. Yes Sir, it was lighted in the kitchen.
Q. Waiting for you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You went up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you use gas there?
A. No Sir.
Q. They used lamps all through the house?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. This was Wednesday, the night before. These people had been sick, had they not?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Mr. and Mrs. Borden had been sick, and Miss Lizzie had been taking care of them, and had been sick herself?
A. That is what they said.
Q. She looked sick, did she not?
A. I did not notice. She told me she was sick that morning.
Q. When did she tell you she was sick?
A. Wednesday morning.
Q. It was the night before, Mr. and Mrs. Borden had been taken ill?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you hear them up around?
A. No Sir.
Q. Their room was under yours?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Miss Lizzie’s was right next to theirs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Her room opened into their room?
Page 53
A Yes Sir.
Q. They were vomiting?
A. Yes Sir, that is what they said.
Q. Mrs. Borden said she was sick, or had been taken sick that night, and was sick nearly all night?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did they all come down to breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you have for breakfast?
A. Pork steak, and johnny cakes and coffee.
Q. This was Wednesday morning, after the sickness?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you have for dinner?
A. Mutton soup and mutton boiled.
Q. Was it mutton soup or a mutton stew, or a thick soup?
A. Soup.
Q. Were they all there to dinner?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Mr. Morse came about half past one, and he had his dinner alone?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you have for supper?
A. Some soup warmed over.
Q. This same soup warmed over?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Whatelse?
A. Some bread, and cake and cookies, and tea.
Q. Where they all there to supper.
A. Mrs. Borden, Miss Lizzie and Mr. Borden.
Q. Emma was away?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Emma had been away two or three weeks?
A. About two weeks I should judge.
Q. What day did she go away?
A. Thursday.
Q. Did Lizzie go with her?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When did Lizzie come home?
A. I could not tell. She came home either a Tuesday or Wednesday.
Q. Then she was gone more than three days?
A. I do not know.
Q. Did not you say yesterday she was gone three days?
A. That is what I merely came to know, so far as I could understand.
Q. Lets have it over, and see. Lizzie and Emma went away, and they went on a Thursday?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Lizzie returned on the following Tuesday you think?
Page 54
A. I think so.
Q. There is Thursday and Friday and Saturday, three; and if she came back Tuesday, she was gone five or six days instead of three, was not she? That would be right, would not it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. So when you said that, you meant she was gone about three days, not exactly three days? Emma was away from that time up, until after this tragedy, this trouble?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did Lizzie go away any time after that, and before the tragedy?
A. I cannot tell.
Q. Did she not go away a Saturday?
A. I dont know.
Q. Did she go away the Saturday before the tragedy?
A. I cannot remember.
Q. Did she go away Sunday?
A. I do not know.
Q. Now they were taken sick Tuesday night; do you remember what they had for supper?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What?
A. Some toasted bread, and some fish, some tea, and cake and cookies.
Q. Toasted bread, fish— fresh fish?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Broiled?
A. Fried.
Q. Sword fish?
A. Yes Sir; fried for dinner, and warmed it over for supper.
Q. That is Tuesday?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you make that bread?
A. They had baker’s bread, and some bread that I made.
Q. This bread they had for supper, was that some you made?
A. They had some of both.
Q. They did have some baker’s bread, who got that?
A. I went and got it.
Q. Who sent you?
A. I went myself.
Q. Did they ask you to go?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you take some money, or have an account?
A. When I went to set the table, I found there was not enough bread for supper, and I went to the baker’s to get some rolls. There was no rolls, I got a loaf of bread. I paid for it with my own money. When I came back Mrs. Borden gave me five cents. When I got back to the door, she met me, and was after sending me back for rolls. I told her they had none there.
Q. What sort of bread was this?
A. I do not know.

Page 55
Q. It was not brown bread?
A. No Sir.
Q. Flour bread?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you eat any of that bread?
A. No Sir.
Q. You ate some of your own bread, perhaps?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That did not make you sick?
A. No Sir.
Q. You were not taken sick that night?
A. No Sir.
Q. Now Wednesday night you had this mutton stew warmed over?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Which you had had at dinner on Wednesday?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Wednesday morning was the morning they came down stairs, and had all been sick?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had the pork steak and something for breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. And Lizzie complained of being sick?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Lizzie stayed in her room all that forenoon, did not she?
A. I suppose so; I did not see her until she came to dinner.
Q. You knew she was up stairs. They were all sick and ailing that day?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She did not go out at all that day, did she, so far as you know?
A. Miss Lizzie? I did not see her.
Q. So far as you know she did not go out?
A. I could not say whether she went out or not.
Q. That Wednesday morning they came down and had all been sick during the night?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. They had breakfast, and they looked pretty badly, or rather Mr. and Mrs. Borden did?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. And Lizzie complained?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. They ate a little breakfast, and Lizzie went back up stairs to her room?
A. I suppose so. She went out of my sight, I do not know where she went.
Q. Wednesday night you went out; and came in after ten o’clock, and everybody had gone to bed, and you took your lamp and went up stairs to
Page 56
bed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Thursday morning when you came down, you went into this kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You came down the carpeted back stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You made your fire?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You went down into the basement and got your kindling wood, and got your coal?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Brought up the kindling wood, and then the hod of coal?
A. The wood first, and then the coal.
Q. Did you bring down your slop pail when you came down?
A. No Sir.
Q. You do usually in the morning?
A. Sometimes.
Q. Did you that morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. At all events you went down cellar and got the kindling wood first?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Came up stairs, and started the fire in the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then went down and got some coal?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That was in the cellar too?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then you went in the dining room and started setting the table?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The table was already set?
A. Yes Sir. I opened the windows and the blinds in the dining room.
Q. Then you began to get breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How did you get the people to breakfast, ring a bell?
A. No Sir. I never called them; they got up themselves.
Q. How did they know it was ready?
A. They always came down themselves, before it was ready, sometimes.
Q. You went into the dining room, and opened the windows, and then went into the kitchen and got breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you do in the kitchen?
A. Opened the back door first, and took in my milk; when the fire was started, went in the dining room and began to get breakfast.
Q. The table was all set?
A. I had to put a good many things on the table, such as milk and butter.
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Q. You did not put those on a long time before they sat down in that warm weather?
A. Sometimes.
Q. Did you that morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. Then you did not have anything particular to do in the dining room until breakfast was about ready?
A. No Sir.
Q. Then you went back into the kitchen, and took in your milk, and began to get breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you have for breakfast?
A. Was this Wednesday?
Q. No, Thursday morning.
A. Mrs. Borden came down directly, before I had anything under way; she asked me what did I have for breakfast. I told her. She said John was in the house. I says is that so? I says, did he sleep in the attic.She said no, he slept in the front chamber. I told her there was nothing, sure, but soup and cold mutton.She said she thought they would have that for dinner. She says there will be plenty for dinner too. She told me to warm it over, and make johnny cakes, and have coffee.
Q. You had the mutton stew or soup, of which you thought there would be enough for dinner?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had a baked johnny cake, you furnished forth hot johnny cake and some coffee?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you have anythingelse for breakfast?
A. Not as I know of.
Q. You had fruit in the house?
A. Not as I know of.
Q. They were in the habit of having fruit?
A. I could not tell whether they had it that morning or not.
Q. They had bananas, did not they?
A. I could not tell.
Q. It was nothing unusual for them to have bananas?
A. Sometimes they did, and sometimes they did not.
Q. Do you know whether there was any bananas on the table that morning?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. It was nothing unusual for them to have fruit in the morning for breakfast?
A. Sometimes; they did not always have them.
Q. You did not have anything to do with the fruit when they had it?
A. I could have it when I wanted it.

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Q. I did not mean they deprived you of eating a banana if you wanted to. It was on the table or on the sideboard in the dining room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you remember any other kind of fruit they had that week or about that time?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did they have any pears?
A. No Sir.
Q. What?
A. There were pears there, but not on the table.
Q. The pears were beginning to get ripe, and were dropping off the trees in the back yard?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had tried them?
A. No Sir.
Q. How did you know they were getting ripe?
A. Mr. Borden brought some in in a basket.
Q. How long before this?
A. That very morning.
Q. The morning of the tragedy?
A. Thursday morning.
Q. Had he brought in any before?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. They had been having pears there, had they, before?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How many days before that?
A. I could not tell you. He brought them in and left them on the kitchen table.
Q. What was done with them then?
A. Nothing. Sometimes he came out when they were rotten, and threw them under the barn.
Q. Who would throw them under the barn?
A. Mr. Borden.
Q. Whether or not those pears that he brought in before Thursday were any of them taken into the
dining room?
A. No Sir, I did not see them.
Q. Did he bring them in and let them rot, and then throw them away?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did not he eat any of them?
A. I dont know. They were left on the kitchen table.
Q. In the basket?
A. He brought them in a day or two before, and put them on the kitchen table, and took those out that were rotten and threw them under the barn.
Q. How were they on the kitchen table?
A. Laid right out, emptied out.
Q. What table?
A. A table right near the closet.
Q. There was a rocking chair in your kitchen?
Page 59
A. Yes Sir.
Q. This was not your cooking table the pears were on?
A. No Sir, the other table.
Q. How many other chairs were there?
A. Three more chairs.
Q. Ordinary plain chairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then you had a pantry opening out of it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Were there an other rooms that opened out of the kitchen, except going into the dining room and sitting room?
A. No Sir.
Q. Then you went to work and baked the johnny cakes, and when breakfast was ready, you set on the milk and butter?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The soup had got warmed over by that time, and you sliced up some cold mutton, and set on the table?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then they came out to breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The only rooms you had been in that morning were the dining room and the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The only rooms you had been in before breakfast was laid?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then Mr. Morse came out to breakfast?
A. Yes Sir, and Mr. and Mrs. Borden.
Q. Did you go in while they were eating breakfast?
A. Putting the breakfast on the table, and pouring the water into glasses, and passed it around. I did not go in until they got through.
Q. They did not call you in for anything?
A. No Sir.
Q. They kept the coffee on the table?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did Mrs. Borden have anything to say to you that morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did not have any talk to you at all?
A. She spoke to me about breakfast, before that.
Q. Say anything else to you before that?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was she in the habit of asking you what work you had to do that day?
A. Right after breakfast.
Q. As soon as she had finished breakfast, she would say “well, Maggie, what have you got to do today?”
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That was a common thing right after breakfast?
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A. Yes Sir.
Q. Now did Mr. Borden go out into the back yard before breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Take anything out?
A. Yes, he took his slop pail out.
Q. Did he go around back of the barn to take that out there?
A. Threw it out in the yard, I guess, and went into the barn and got some water.
Q. The door of the barn was open that Thursday morning?
A. He had a key, and opened it himself.
Q. He opened it, and got some water?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. There was running water in the barn?
A. Yes Sir, as you go into the barn, and turn to your right.
Q. It was down stairs in the barn, on the first floor of the barn, by the big doors?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where did he empty that, near the back part of the yard, or midway?
A. Out in the yard.
Q. Near Dr. Chagnon’s fence?
A. Right beside the pear tree.
Q. There are a good many trees there, pear trees?
A. The next pear tree to the barn.
Q. When he went into the barn, do you know whether he went up stairs or not?
A. No Sir.
Q. How long was he there?
A. I could not tell.
Q. Then he came back again?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. This was all before breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did Mrs. Borden go out?
A. No Sir.
Q. She did not go out of the house then?
A. No Sir.
Q. This back entry way you speak of that comes in at the north door, and goes into the kitchen, was a pretty large entry way? Where did you keep the ice chest?
A. A closet that goes from the entry, in, and the ice chest sets in there.
Q. It was in a closet that opens off the entry. You do not have to bring the ice into the kitchen?
A. No Sir.
Q. You come into the entry, and put the ice in the chest?
A. Yes Sir.

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Q. Was there anything else that opened off that entry way but that closet or room where the ice chest was?
A. No.
Q. You went up stairs out of that entry way?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Any hooks there on the wall, or nails, or anything to hang clothing on in the entry way?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Who hung clothes there?
A. Nobody hung clothes there, except my apron.
Q. Was not there a hat ever hung there?
A. No Sir, not in that entry.
Q. What, the back entry?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you ever see a woman’s hat hung up there?
A. No Sir, except mine.
Q. You hung up your own hat there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did Miss Lizzie ever have a hat hung there?
A. I did not see it.
Q. A sort of a soft felt hat, or a rough hat?
A. She might while brushing it, or something. She did not keep it there that I recollect.
Q. Any other clothing?
A. A shawl that belongs to the house; sometimes I used to take it on my shoulders to go to the store, or something like that.
Q. Have you given me a description of all the clothing you were in the habit of keeping in that kitchen that goes to the north door, or rather in that entry way?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you have a clothes closet in the kitchen?
A. No Sir.
Q. Were there not closets connected with any of the rooms down stairs?
A. There was one in the sitting room, I think.
Q. What was kept there?
A. I do not know what they kept; a basket with clothes in it.
Q. Mrs. Borden had her bonnet and shawl down stairs?
A. Yes Sir, she kept them in the closet in the sitting room; sometimes her common shawl was there.
Q. If she wanted to go out, she could go to the closet in the sitting room and get her bonnet and shawl, and go out without going up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What else was kept there?
A. Some clothes belonging to Mr. Borden, I guess.
Q. This jacket he put on in the morning, was not a dressing gown, but a common cardigan jacket?
A. Yes Sir.
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Q. Where was that kept?
A. In the sitting room, as you go into the sitting room from the kitchen; there was a nail there.
Q. By the stove?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. In the sitting room closet, beside the bonnet and shawl, and the outside gear Mrs. Borden kept there, what clothing did Mr. Borden have there?
A. I used to see coats there sometimes, old coats.
Q. How do you know Mr. Borden went into the barn that morning after he emptied his pail?
A. I saw him.
Q. Where were you when you saw him?
A. In the kitchen.
Q. Looking out of the window?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You are quite sure you did not go into any room before breakfast, except the kitchen and dining room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You did not have occasion to go into the dining room, except to arrange the table and raise the window?
A. That is all.
Q. Now you say Mrs. Borden was in the habit of saying, as soon as you finished breakfast, “well Maggie, what have you got to do today?”
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She said that that day, did not she?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What time did Mr. Morse go away?
A. Pretty near nine o’clock, probably.
Q. Did you see him go?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Which way did he go out?
A. The back way.
Q. How do you know it was nine o’clock?
A. It was pretty near it.
Q. Did you have any clock in your kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you have a clock in your bed room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You think it was before nine o’clock?
A. I know it was.
Q. 20 minutes before nine?
A. I could not exactly tell the time, but I saw him going out.
Q. He stayed there sometime after breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Mrs. Borden was around the house there?
A. I did not see her; she was in the sitting room I think.
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Q. Dusting?
A. I dont know.
Q. She was in the habit of doing it, was not she?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. After breakfast, you say she said “Maggie, what have you got to do today?” as usual, then she said you had better wash the windows?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had washed them before; you knew what it was to wash the windows?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had been in the habit of doing that every once in a while?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She told you to wash them on the outside and the in?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Had Lizzie come down then?
A. Yes Sir. Lizzie was through her breakfast then, I think, I should judge she was.
Q. Through what?
A. Through her breakfast, after eating her breakfast.
Q. Did she eat any breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where?
A. In the kitchen.
Q. What?
A. Cookie and coffee.
Q. Are you sure she took any coffee?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How much, one or two cups?
A. She does not ever take two cups.
Q. Are you sure she took coffee that morning?
A. She said she was to have coffee and cookie for her breakfast.
Q. Do you know she took it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You saw her drink it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that after Mr. Morse had gone?
A. I could not tell.
Q. You saw Mr. Morse go?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do not you know whether she came down before or after Mr. Morse went?
A. I dont know. She ate her breakfast in the kitchen.
Q. If Mr. Morse went, he would have to go out the side door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She was in the kitchen eating her breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She came down about nine o’clock?
A. I think it was something before nine, by my thinking.
Q. Five minutes of nine?

Page 64
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Whether it was as early as half past eight?
A. I think it was later than that; of course I did not notice the time?
Q. You think it was between half past eight and nine o’clock she came down?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She came into the kitchen?
A. I could not tell what time it was. She came right into the kitchen.
Q. She said she was going to have a cookie and some coffee for breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where did she sit down?
A. By the kitchen table, and this chair was facing.
Q. What chair did she sit down in?
A. In a big old chair that is right by the window, by the side of the table.
Q. Was there any rocking chair there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did she sit in that?
A. No Sir.
Q. This chair is an arm chair?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see her reading there?
A. I did not.
Q. Did you see her reading there any time that forenoon?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you have any books there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was not there some old Harpers there, a magazine with pictures in it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where were they kept?
A. In a closet in the kitchen.
Q. You had seen her there looking at them, or reading them?
A. Sometimes I would.
Q. You have seen her sitting down in the kitchen doing that?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How many times?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Often?
A. Not very often.
Q. She came into the kitchen and sat down there?
A. Not very often.
Q. She has done that before, and you have seen her sit down and read there, and look at these magazines?
A. Once in a while.

Page 65
Q. Do you remember whether that morning she sat down in the chair there and read?
A. I did not see her.
Q. You do not remember about it?
A. No Sir.
Q. She partook of her breakfast, what were you doing then?
A. I went out in the back yard when she was eating her breakfast.
Q. Where did she come from?
A. The sitting room.
Q. Where were you?
A. At the sink.
Q. Did you not say yesterday afternoon, the first you saw of her, was when she was there in the screen door, when you were coming back with the poll for the brush?
A. No Sir.
Q. That is not so, at all events?
A. No Sir.
Q. The first you saw of her you were at the kitchen sink?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Cleaning up the breakfast dishes?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. She came in there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had not then got your brush or pail or pole to wash the windows?
A. No Sir.
Q. She did not then come to the screen door first, as you were coming in, and ask you what you were going to do, and talk about leaving it open, or fastening it?
A. No Sir.
Q. When was that?
A. About an hour later, I should judge, or probably half an hour.
Q. Which do you say?
A. I could not state the time.
Q. Your first impression was an hour?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What had you been doing during that hour?
A. I was washing up my dishes, and cleaning up my kitchen, straightening it out.
Q. Was she sitting there in the kitchen?
A. No Sir.
Q. She did not take her breakfast right off?
A. She had whatever she had, there.
Q. Was she eating her breakfast when you were washing your dishes?
A. No Sir, I was out in the yard when she was eating her breakfast.
Q. When you were out in the yard, and were coming in from the yard, was the time you had the talk about the screen door?
A. No Sir.

Page 66
Q. You went out in the yard, that is when you were sick?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When were you taken sick?
A. I felt kind of sick that morning when I was getting up; I did not notice it, because I was always
having headaches.
Q. Did you touch the milk?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You did not eat any of the bread?
A. No Sir.
Q. They did not eat any of the milk?
A. I think they had it on the toast.
Q. When?
A. Wednesday night.
Q. They were taken sick Tuesday night, you know.
A. Whatever night they had the toast, I know Mr. Borden had milk in it.
Q. You felt sort of sick Thursday morning?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What had you eaten the night before?
A. I do not know. I had some mutton soup, and some bread.
Q. What bread, your own bread?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Anythingelse?
A. No Sir.
Q. Eaten any fruit?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you taste of a pear at all?
A. No Sir.
Q. Not while they were on your kitchen table?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not like them?
A. No Sir.
Q. You never eat them?
A. I do.
Q. Not while you were at the Borden’s?
A. I did last summer, but I am not any great lover of them.
Q. You did not take any of them this year?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you were out in the back yard, when she came down stairs, was the time you were sick to your stomach and vomiting?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you go out near the barn?
A. I went out near the pear tree.
Q. Did you go out into the barn then?
A. No Sir.
Q. You went into the barn to get the pole?
A. That was later.
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Q. Now you came back in again. Had Lizzie had her breakfast then?
A. No Sir.
Q. Had you finished washing your dishes?
A. No Sir.
Q. You came back and washed your dishes?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What was Lizzie doing?
A. I do not know. She was not in the kitchen that I remember.
Q. Had Mr. Morse gone away then?
A. I do not know.
Q. You did not see him go?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Can you not remember whether Mr. Morse went away before or after you finished washing your dishes?
A. He went away before I finished washing my dishes.
Q. Did he go away while you were washing your dishes?
A. Yes Sir. I was washing the dishes when Mr. Borden went to the door with him; he did not go out.
Q. That was after Lizzie had eaten her breakfast?
A. I cannot remember what time it was about Lizzie, and her breakfast.
Q. I presume you cannot remember; I want to see whether you can or not. Was that after you had been out in the back yard, and been sick to your stomach?
A. No Sir.
Q. Now wont you stop to think a moment. I do not want to press you too rapidly, or confuse you.
A. I know Mr. Morse was gone when I went out in the yard.
Q. Then you came back to finish washing the dishes?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. And Lizzie had her breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. After you had finished washing the dishes?
A. She was through before I got through.
Q. Lizzie had her breakfast after you finished washing the dishes?
A. No Sir; she got through before I got through washing the dishes.
Q. That is the way it is?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was she having her breakfast when you went in the back yard, and were taken sick to your stomach?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you went out in the back yard, and were sick to your stomach, somewhat, Morse had gone?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You said you came back and went to washing your dishes, and he was gone before you finished your
dishes, and Mr. Borden went to the door and let him out?
A. Yes.
Page 68

Q. Whether Mr. Morse went away before you were sick to your stomach and went out in the back yard, and then came back and finished your dishes?
A. I think he had gone before I went out; I am not sure, but I think he had.
Q. When you came back from the back yard, and went in, washing dishes, Lizzie was there in the kitchen?
A. I did not see her. I left her in the kitchen when I went out.
Q. When you came back from the back yard, that is the last you saw of Lizzie for sometime?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You think Mr. Morse had gone?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Mr. Borden had not gone?
A. I dont know. I did not see him then.
Q. You saw Mr. Borden go away that morning, did you not?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did he usually, or always, go out the back door?
A. Sometimes.
Q. Was not it his habit?
A. I did not see him going out as he went down street, at all.
Q. Was it not his custom to go out of the back door?
A. He went out that way a great deal.
Q. He did not go out when Mr. Morse went?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not see him go out that morning at all?
A. No Sir.
Q. So far as you know, Mr. Borden was in the house then?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. He let Mr. Morse out, and told him to came back to dinner, and then went back into the sitting room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You finished washing the dishes?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you do after that?
A. I put the dining room dishes away, and met Mrs. Borden there, and she asked me to wash the windows. That was when I got through with my dining room dishes, I spoke to Mrs. Borden; that was about nine o’clock, so far as I can think of the time.
Q. Lizzie had had her breakfast?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. And Morse had gone?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Mr. Borden, you do not know where he was?
A. No Sir.
Q. You never saw him after that?
A. No Sir.
Q. Mrs. Borden was in the dining room?

Page 69
A. Yes Sir, dusting.
Q. You say that is the first time she told you about washing the windows?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you not say before, that she was in the habit of asking you what you had to do that morning, after breakfast?
A. That was the first time she spoke to me after breakfast.
Q. That was the first of it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Not when Mr. Morse was at the table?
A. No Sir.
Q. Not while they were sitting around there?
A. No Sir.
Q. Then this was unusual?
A. She always came out in the kitchen after breakfast, which she did not this morning at all.Q. Then this was unusual?
A. Sometimes she did; but more times she would not.
Q. You told me—
A. Not just after breakfast; sometimes she would go and sit down.
Q. Within a few minutes, ten or fifteen. This was an hour or a half after breakfast?
A. About nine o’clock I guess.
Q. Was it not unusual for her to wait so long?
A. No Sir.
Q. At about nine o’clock every day did she ask you what you had to do?
A. Sometimes she did not need to. I knew myself.
Q. She asked you what you were going to do in the dining room, before you went to get your pail and brush?
A. Not right away.
Q. How soon?
A. About forty minutes, or half an hour after.
Q. You mean forty minutes?
A. Yes, it was a good while after Mrs. Borden spoke to me.
Q. You think perhaps it was half an hour before you went to work to get your pail and brush?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You finished washing your dishes when you went into the dining room, and when Mrs. Borden spoke to you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What were you doing in that forty minutes.
A. I always put away the dining room dishes first, then I had a good deal to do to straighten my kitchen, and to put everything in the closet, and straighten my stove.

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Q. That took you half an hour, or forty minutes?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then what did you do?
A. Went down cellar and got my pail.
Q. Where did you get it?
A. Down cellar in the laundry.
Q. That is the wash room in the back side of the cellar, with the bulk head door that goes out into the back yard?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then what did you do?
A. Got a brush and went out of doors; went out in the back yard and got a big handle out of the barn.
Q. You went into the barn?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Wherebouts in the barn did you go, in one of the stalls, or up stairs?
A. Right facing when you go in the door.
Q. In one of the stalls?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You went in there and got that?
A. Yes Sir. I came out, and got a pail of water out of the barn, and went and began to wash the windows.
Q. You did not come in at all?
A. No Sir.
Q. You said you had some talk with Lizzie at the screen door?
A. Yes, as I was going out with the pail, she spoke to me.
Q. You spoke to her as you were going out, and not when you came back?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Tell us about that.
A. Miss Lizzie asked me if I was going to wash windows. I said yes.
Q. Where was that?
A. That was at the back door; I was outside, and she inside.
Q. You were outside, just as you were going out?
A. I had a pail and brush.
Q. You were going out, and she followed you?
A. Yes Sir, she was in the hall, in the back entry.
Q. Did you go by her when you went out?
A. I did not see her.
Q. Could she have come down the back stairs?
A. I did not see her.
Q. The first thing you know, after you got outside the screen door, having the pail and brush, she spoke
to you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had not been to the barn then?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not come into the house then, after you had been to the barn?
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A. Not right away.
Q. Do you not think you went to the barn and got a pail, then came back into the house, and met Miss Lizzie at the screen door?
A. No Sir.
Q. You do not think you said so yesterday?
A. No Sir.
Q. If you did say so yesterday, you were mistaken?
A. I did not say so.
Q. She had some talk with you about the screen door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You said to her she need not fasten it, unless she wanted to?
A. She did not say anything about fastening it. I said “you need not fasten it, I will be around out here, but you can fasten it, if you want to. I will get the water in the barn.”
Q. She did not fasten it, or say anything?
A. No Sir.
Q. You went to the barn and got the water?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How many times did you go?
A. I do not know.
Q. You must have used fifteen or twenty pails of water?
A. No.
Q. How many?
A. Six or seven I should judge.
Q. You washed two windows in the sitting room, three in the parlor, and two in the dining room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had subsequently to take the dipper and rinse them off?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You think you used six or seven pails of water?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Every time you wanted a pail of water, you went to the barn and got it, went into the barn?
A. Yes, I went into the kitchen for the dipper.
Q. You used some pails of water before you went into the kitchen for the dipper?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Every pail of water you wanted, you had to go to the barn and get?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You went into the barn, and drew the pail of water, and then came back again?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What windows had you washed before you came in for the dipper?
A. I had them all washed all around with the brush.
Q. You began with the sitting room on the south side of the house, and then went around to the parlor on the front side of the house?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then went around to the dining room, which took you on the

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north side?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where did you begin to rinse them off?
A. Begun at the sitting room.
Q. Just as you had washed them?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where was the dipper you got?
A. In the kitchen sink.
Q. The ordinary tin dipper?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you shut any of the windows before you went out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you shut them all?
A. All that was up. I think there was one up in the sitting room.
Q. Which was that?
A. I could not tell you?
Q. You say you did not see Mr. Borden go away?
A. No Sir.
Q. He was in the habit of going out the back door?
A. Yes Sir, sometimes.
Q. He did not go out that way before you went to washing the windows?
A. I did not see him.
Q. Mrs. Borden had her bonnet and shawl there in the sitting room closet?
A. She generally did have.
Q. After you rinsed off the windows, as you emptied the pail, you went in the barn and got another one?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. This barn was open up into the roof up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. There is a stair way that leads up there? There was a lot of old truck in the barn, carriages, and old boxes and implements?
A. I did not go where the carriages was. I know they were there.
Q. After you finished rinsing the windows, what did you do?
A. I commenced to wash the sitting room windows inside.
Q. You came in at the kitchen and went into the sitting room?
A. Yes Sir, I got water and cloths to get ready to wash them?
Q. Was you also going to just rub over the outside too with your cloth?
A. No Sir.
Q. You finished washing outside with the brush, and rinsing them with the dipper?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You went into the sitting room, did you raise both windows there?
A. As I was washing them.
Q. Did you raise both at once?

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A. First one and then the other.
Q. How many windows had you washed before you heard anything at the front door?
A. I had the upper part washed of one of them.
Q. Was that the one nearest the kitchen or parlor?
A. The one nearest to the hall.
Q. That window was up, was it not?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you hear the bell ring?
A. I do not know whether I heard the bell ring or not.
Q. You do not recollect today, whether you heard that bell ring or not?
A. No Sir. I know I heard the noise at the door.
Q. You cannot tell whether the bell rang or not?
A. No Sir.
Q. Who tended the bell there in the house?
A. I tended it when nobody was in the house. When Mrs. Borden was in, she went. Mr. Borden went always when he was in the house.
Q. You made a coal fire that morning, did not you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you have any boiler there, or have to heat the water with a tea kettle?
A. Heat the water with a tea kettle.
Q. You did not finish washing the dishes until after nine o’clock?
A. Not right finished up.
Q. Then you had to go in there and work around, after Mrs. Borden gave you this direction you testified to, cleaning up in the kitchen? You had a coal fire?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where did you keep the flat irons?
A. In a little closet, back of the stove in the kitchen.
Q. Did you have more than one ironing board?
A. Two.
Q. One was larger than the other? The larger was used by you?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Who used the other?
A. They used it themselves, and they used it when they had a dress maker.
Q. Mrs. Borden and Lizzie and Emma used it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Were they in the habit of ironing on the dining room table?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. It was nothing unusual to have the board on the dining room table?
A. No Sir.
Q. When did you wash that week?
A. Monday.

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Q. Are you sure, did not you wash Tuesday? Was not Monday a stormy day?
A. Yes Sir. I washed Monday.
Q. When did you hang your clothes out?
A. Tuesday.
Q. When did you begin to iron?
A. Wednesday.
Q. If you washed Monday, it was not a good drying day?
A. No Sir. I did not hang them out until Tuesday.
Q. Then you hung them out by going the back way from the cellar?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you finish ironing Wednesday evening?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you go out Wednesday evening?
A. Yes Sir,
Q. What time did you get home?
A. Five minutes past ten.
Q. And had your key?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did anybody come with you?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did anybody walk with you that night?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where did you leave the clothes you had ironed Wednesday evening?
A. I put them on the table, folded, and Mr. Borden took a pile, and the girls took the other pile.
Q. When?
A. Wednesday morning.
Q. What girls?
A. Miss Lizzie’s and Miss Emma’s clothes. I always separated them, and laid them in piles.
Q. You said you separated the piles, and Mr. Borden took one, and the girls took their piles; you do not mean that, because Emma was not there?
A. Miss Lizzie must have taken them then.
Q. They did not take them until Thursday morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. They were not ready to be taken?
A. They were on the clothes horse.
Q. They were hung to air as was your habit after finishing ironing?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You folded them up Thursday morning?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You took them off the clothes horse and folded them up?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Perhaps that is one of the things you did after breakfast?
A. No Sir, while I was getting breakfast.
Q. There was one pile for Mr. Borden’s room, and one for Lizzie’s and Emma’s room?
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A. Yes Sir.
Q. They were not ready until Thursday morning?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where did you pile them up?
A. On the kitchen table.
Q. Where the pears were?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. In the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Now this small ironing board which you say they were in the habit of using was kept where?
A. In the kitchen closet, behind the door.
Q. It was very much smaller than the ordinary board?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How long was it do you think?
A. Maybe something about that length.
Q. About as long as the side of the rail of the desk?
A. Yes. Maybe longer or shorter.
Q. How wide was it?
A. Not quite as wide as a large ironing board.
Q. Wider than that sheet of paper?
A. Yes Sir, something wider than that.
Q. Was it cloth covered?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you know how the cloth was fastened on?
A. I do not know.
Q. Do not you remember?
A. No Sir.
Q. Pinned on?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Mrs. Borden and Lizzie and you were in the habit of using that for ironing their small things; and they did it on the dining room table?
A. Yes Sir, if it was hot weather; sometimes they did it in the kitchen.
Q. That was the custom with that small ironing board?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You said Lizzie was ironing, or trying to iron in the dining room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see any flats on the stove?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was she sitting in a chair in the kitchen?
A. When she was ironing?
Q. At that time?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you see her in the kitchen there at all?
A. No Sir. She came in the kitchen before I went up stairs.
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A. No; not to my memory, I did not see her.
Q. Did not you ever see her there in the kitchen in the rocking chair, the big chair, reading?
A. I do not remember.
Q. Did not you say this morning, you had seen her there reading?
A. Not that morning.
Q. At any time?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Are you prepared to say when you came in for the dipper, she was not sitting reading in the kitchen?
A. I do not remember to see her.
Q. You would not say she was not?
A. No Sir. I do not remember of seeing her.
Q. When you came in for the dipper, you went right straight out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where did you get the dipper from?
A. At the sink, at the head of it.
Q. Now I will come back again to your finding her ironing. Did you see the handkerchiefs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you know when she sprinkled them?
A. No Sir.
Q. Do you know when she washed them?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did not she wash some handkerchiefs several days before that?
A. Lizzie always washed her own handkerchiefs.
Q. Several days before that?
A. No Sir.
Q. They were not washed that week, because you washed on Monday, and dried Tuesday, and ironed Wednesday?
A. I do not remember.
Q. Do you remember whether she sprinkled any handkerchiefs in the kitchen?
A. I do not remember. I often saw her do it.
Q. Did you see a pile of handkerchiefs on the dining room table when she was trying to iron, or ironing them?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Were they rolled up, as clothes are when they are ironed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did they appear to be sprinkled?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When you came in after the dipper, was not she there in the kitchen?
A. I did not see her.
Q. Just think a moment?
A. Not to my memory, I did not see her.
Q. When you came in for the dipper, was not she there in the kitchen, there in the arm chair you speak of, or in the rocking chair? Just think a moment; wait and take your time.

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Q. They are sprinkled because they are a little too dry to iron?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. These appeared that way?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you know how many she had ironed?
A. No Sir.
Q. Some were ironed, you think, and there was a roll unironed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You are not sure whether the door bell rung or not?
A. I do not remember.
Q. You went to the door, and she was ironing?
A. She was not ironing when I went to the door.
Q. You said you found her ironing there when you went into the sitting room?
A. No Sir.
Q. You do not mean that, then?
A. No Sir.
Q. You heard the door bell ring?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When did she begin to iron then?
A. She began to iron when I was getting through with the windows.
Q. You had begun with the window in the sitting room?
A. In the dining room.
Q. Did you not wash the sitting room windows before you did the dining room windows?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You had not finished the sitting room window when Mr. Borden came?
A. No Sir.
Q. You do not know whether you heard the bell ring or not?
A. No Sir.
Q. You are not able to say whether she was in the kitchen or not; you say you do not recollect of seeing her? You would not swear she was not in the kitchen when you came in with your dipper?
A. No Sir. I did not see her.
Q. You say you saw some handkerchiefs on the dining room table?
A. Not at that time.
Q. You did not see them there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You heard the bell ring?
A. I heard the noise; I went to the door.
Q. You are not sure whether the bell rung or not?
A. No Sir.
Q. You went to the door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was everyone of those locks fastened?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What did you say?
Page 78
A. I went to the door, and let Mr. Borden in.
Q. What did you say?
A. Say to who?
Q. When you were opening the door. I am waiting Miss Sullivan.
A. I let Mr. Borden in. I got puzzled at the door, I said “Oh pshaw” at the door. Miss Lizzie laughed up stairs.
Q. That is all you said “Oh, pshaw”?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Why did you object to telling me that? Do you consider that to be all wrong?
A. No Sir.
Q. That is all, and everything you said “Oh pshaw”?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. And she laughed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. In her room?
A. Either in her room, or in the hall, I do not know which.
Q. Was not she in her own room?
A. I do not know.
Q. What did you do?
A. I let Mr. Borden in, and went back to my work in the sitting room.
Q. Where did he go?
A. In the dining room.
Q. What happened next?
A. Miss Lizzie came down a little while after.
Q. Do you know whether she did or not?
A. Yes Sir, she came through the hall, and in from the sitting room.
Q. Did you see her come through the hall?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you say so yesterday?
A. Yes Sir. The first she came there, she came from the hall into the sitting room.
Q. Who was in the sitting room?
A. I was there.
Q. Where was her father?
A. In the dining room.
Q. She went in there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. And asked him if there was any mail?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. He said none for her?
A. I do not know what he said; they were talking.
Q. Did he have anything in his hand?
A. When I saw him. I did not see him then.
Q. When he came in, did he have anything in his hand?
A. A parcel.
Q. A white parcel?
A. Yes Sir.

Page 79
Q. Any key or brass lock in his hand?
A. I did not notice it.
Q. Did one hand seem to be free, and the other to have a package in it?
A. I did not notice, only that he had a little package.
Q. He sat down in the dining room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What passed between them then?
A. I heard Miss Lizzie tell him about a note, that the mother had a note, and had gone out, very slowly. They were talking very slowly, and were talking to themselves.
Q. Why do you put in that expression, “very slowly”? Why do you use that expression, because she said it so?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Because she said that very much more slowly than anything else she said?
A. Well, no.
Q. She did not?
A. No Sir.
Q. Everything she said, she said very slowly?
A. Ordinarily slow.
Q. Do you mean I should understand when she spoke about the letter or note, that Mrs. Borden had got, she spoke more slowly than she did the rest of it?
A. No Sir, just the same.
Q. And had gone out?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did her father make any reply to that?
A. No Sir. I did not hear him saying anything.
Q. What did you do next?
A. I finished washing the sitting room windows.
Q. What did you do next?
A. I washed the windows.
Q. In what room?
A. The sitting room and dining room both.
Q. Had you finished the sitting room window then?
A. No Sir. Mr. Borden came through the kitchen door, and took a key off his shelf, and went up into his room.
Q. Up stairs did he keep a safe?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. In a room leading off his room?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Since you have been there, that house has been broken into?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. And entered in broad day light?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Money and a gold watch, and things taken?
A. So they said.
Q. Drawers broken open?

Page 80
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You were at home that day?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where were you?
A. Doing my work.
Q. You did not see anybody come in or go out?
A. No Sir.
Q. Miss Emma was in the house that day, up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. All this happened in broad daylight, and nobody saw anybody come or go?
A. No Sir.
Q. How long ago was that?
A. A year last July, I guess.
Q. Since that time the barn has been broken into?
A. I think it was.
Q. How long ago was the barn burglarized?
A. I cannot tell you.
Q. Not long ago?
A. I do not think so.
Q. Within a few months the barn was broken into, and something taken or tried to be taken out of that, so far as you know?
A. Yes Sir,
Q. Has the barn been broken into more than once? It has been twice, has it not?
A. I do not remember.
Q. You only remember once?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Now he went into the sitting room, took this key and went up stairs to his room.?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. What was you doing?
A. Washing the sitting room windows. As he came down, I was taking the step ladder from the sitting room into the dining room. He went in the sitting room, and sat down at the window in the sitting room, and had a paper or book, or something in his hand. I cannot tell what it was. That was the last I saw of him.
Q. Did you go in the dining room from there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was Lizzie there then?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you know where she was?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did she come into the dining room?
A. She came from the sitting room into the dining room.
Q. Did she bring the ironing board in then?
A. No Sir.

Page 81
Q. Were the handkerchiefs on the table?
A. I did not see them.
Q. What was you doing then?
A. Washing windows in the dining room. I got through my windows, Miss Lizzie came from the kitchen with an ironing board, and placed it on the table.
Q. This small board?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did she begin to iron?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did she bring these handkerchiefs you told us about— did she bring them in then?
A. I suppose so.
Q. Did you see her have them?
A. No. I saw them on the table.
Q. They were rolled up, and appeared to be sprinkled?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see her iron any of them?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. How many did she iron, two or three?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Did she go back into the kitchen again?
A. She had a flat ironing.
Q. Did she go into the kitchen, and get another one?
A. I do not remember.
Q. Did she say anything to you?
A. She said then, was I going out. She asked me if I was going out this afternoon. I said I did not know, I might and I might not. I was not feeling very well. She said if I went out, to be sure and fasten the back door, she might be out too, and Mrs. Borden out. Mrs. Borden had a note that morning, she said she had gone out on a sick call. I asked her who was sick. She said she had a note that morning; so it must be in
town.
Q. Did she say anythingelse to you then?
A. Not then.
Q. Directly afterwards?
A. I got through with my work, and was in the kitchen. Then she told me there was a sale of dress goods in Sargent’s, eight cents a yard. I said I would have one. That is all.
Q. Did not she make the statement about the sale of dress goods at Frank Sargeants, if that is the name, two or three days before that?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did she ever tell you about any sale at Sargeants before this particular day?
A. No Sir.
Q. It is the first time she ever mentioned it?
A. Yes Sir.

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Q. About any chance of buying any?
A. Yes sir. Emma had a good many times told me about bargains.
Q. Miss Lizzie had not before, so far as you recollect?
A. No Sir.
Q. What did you do next?
A. I went up stairs directly after that.
Q. You went up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Now you said that was a few minutes of eleven when you went up stairs?
A. Yes Sir, three or four minutes of eleven.
Q. Did you look at the clock in the kitchen?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you at the one in your room when you got up stairs?
A. No Sir.
Q. So far as the clock in your room is concerned, you have no recollection of what time it was then you got up stairs?
A. I think it was two or three minutes afterwards.
Q. You laid on the outside of the bed?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you take off your shoes or any clothing?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you go to bed?
A. No Sir.
Q. When you laid there, you heard the clock strike eleven?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When Miss Lizzie shouted to you, as you said yesterday, did you look at your clock?
A. No Sir.
Q. You said you thought it was ten or fifteen minutes past eleven?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that your impression merely?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You did not look at any clock?
A. No Sir.
Q. When you got down stairs you found her up against the door?
A. She was standing near the door.
Q. Was she leaning against it, or holding on to it?
A. I did not notice. She was leaning up, as anybody would be, against the door.
Q. Was she standing up near the door?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was she against it?
A. I should think she was.
Q. Did she have her hands to her face, or head at that time?
A. Not that I knew of.
Q. Was she wringing her hands, or doing anything at that time?

Page 83
A. No Sir.
Q. You did not see her?
A. No Sir.
Q. She sent you for Dr. Bowen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You hurried across, and did not find him, and came back again?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Then she sent you for Miss Russell, down on Borden street? You went there, and came back?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see Mrs. Churchill?
A. No Sir, not until I came back.
Q. When you got back from Miss Russell’s, did you see Mrs. Churchill?
A. Yes Sir, she was in the house.
Q. Did you tell her anything about this affair? Did you talk with her about it?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you tell her anything about any note?
A. Yes Sir, I guess the note was going all around; everybody was talking about the note.
Q. Whether you told her anything about a note.
A. Yes Sir, I guess she told me what Miss Lizzie was telling me.
Q. Did you tell Mrs. Churchill Mrs. Borden had told you she had a note from somebody, and was going on a sick call, and went away without telling you where she went?
A. No Sir, Mrs. Borden did not say anything to me about a note.
Q. Whether you said to Mrs. Churchill that? Do you remember of talking with her about it?
A. I might tell her what Miss Lizzie told me.
Q. Never mind about the might. I want to call to your mind, if I can, whether in the talk you had with Mrs. Churchill, you said to her that Mrs. Borden was away; that she told you that she had got a note, and had gone off on a sick call; and she went away without telling you anything about it?
A. I do not know if I told her that.
Q. Or without telling you where she was going?
A. I do not remember if I did.
Q. What do you think about it?
A. I do not remember it.
Q. You do not remember saying anything of that sort?
A. No Sir.
Q. You did talk with Mrs. Churchill?
A. Yes Sir I did.
Q. Did you go for Dr. Bowen more than once?
A. Yes, I went twice.
Q. You went first for Dr. Bowen, and came back, and then went for Miss Russell, and then went for Dr. Bowen again?
Page 84
A. I went over, Miss Lizzie sent me over, to tell Mrs. Bowen to come over.
Q. Then you went across the street three times?
A. I went twice to Dr. Bowen’s. I went down to Miss Russell’s once.
Q. Did you go over to Mrs. Bowen’s after you came back from Miss Russell’s?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. You went first for Dr. Bowen, then for Miss Russell, and then came back and went for Mrs. Bowen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That is the way of it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Were you in the habit of going out in the back yard?
A. No Sir, excepting my business would carry me there.
Q. There were a number of trees there, pear trees?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Any other trees?
A. Not as I know of.
Q. A pile of boards against Dr. Chagnon’s fence?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was Mr. Borden in the habit of opening the barn early in the morning?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. With the key he himself had?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. It stayed open all day?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was he in the habit of going there, in the barn?
A. I did not notice.
Q. You do not know whether any of the family went to the barn during the day, or not, except from guess work?
A. No Sir.
Q. They may have gone twenty times a day, and you not know anything about it?
A. No Sir; I did not see them.
Q. Did you go up stairs in this house, after Miss Lizzie gave the alarm? Did you go up stairs in the house where Mrs. Borden was, before or after you went for Mrs. Bowen?
A. After I went up stairs.
Q. You went for Mrs. Bowen after you went up stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. When was it that you went down cellar the day of the tragedy, I mean after it happened, when was it you went down cellar?
A. I could not tell you what time it was.
Q. Was it pretty soon after?
A. I should think it was. I could not tell the time.
Q. You went down with some officers?
A. Yes Sir.
Page 85
Q. Wherebouts in the cellar did you go?
A. I went in all the rooms, I think.
Q. You said these men found some axes in a box?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. This box was where?
A. In the little room back of the furnace.
Q. Was that in the part of the cellar towards the front side of the house?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The furthest from the stairway where you went down stairs?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The stairway that goes into the cellar, goes down from the back entry?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. That takes you down under the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. The wash room is under the kitchen?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. With a door into the back yard?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Going along through the cellar is a room, what is that used for, a water closet?
A. No Sir, Mr. Borden kept wood there for the furnace.
Q. Beyond that was the furnace, going towards the front?
A. There was the furnace, and there was the door.
Q. This box in which the axes were, was near the front part of the cellar? That part of the cellar that is under the front part of the house?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Who found those axes?
A. I could not tell you who the officers were; I was with them.
Q. How many were there?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. What kind of a box were they in?
A. A box we used to keep starch in, I think.
Q. That starch would come in?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Standing, with their heads down in the box, and their handles sticking up?
A. As near as I can remember.
Q. Can you tell how many there were?
A. No Sir, I saw them there; one of the officers took them.
Q. Did you see them up stairs?
A. No Sir, I do not remember.
Q. Did you see them on the table up stairs?
A. No Sir.
Q. Do you know what officer it was?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you know any one of the officers who went down stairs at the

Page 86
time you did?
A. No sir. They were all strangers to me; I did not know any of them.
Q. When you saw Miss Lizzie there at the foot of the stairs, at that time when she gave the alarm, what
dress did she have on?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Dark or light?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. What dress did she wear that morning?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Did you see any blood on her?
A. No Sir, I did not notice any blood on her.
Q. Did you see any blood anywhere, except in the places told about in this case?
A. No Sir.
Q. Where with reference to these back stairs was this room that was broken into when the money was taken, and the gold watch &c?
A. At the top of the back stairs, Mrs. Borden’s room.
Q. Is that where the safe is?
A. Going in from where Mrs. Borden’s bed room is.
Q. If I understand you, this room that was burglarized, when the house was entered sometime ago, was a room that led out of Mrs. Borden’s room? You could get into it by going up the back stairs?
A. You have to go into Mrs. Borden’s room first.
Q. That leads out of the back stairway?
A. Yes.
Q. Those stairs are carpeted, and have been for years?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you know what dress Mrs. Borden had on that day?
A. No Sir.
Q. What dress did you have on?
A. A calico dress.
Q. Where is that dress now?
A. Down home where I am.
Q. You are staying here in town?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Did you see Mr. Borden at any time that morning empty his pail, his slop pail?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Was that before or after breakfast?
A. Before breakfast.
Q. Did you see Miss Lizzie empty hers?
A. No Sir.
Q. Was she in the habit of doing it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. They each did that, and were accustomed to do it?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Do you know who emptied the slop pail, if there was any, in the

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room Mr. Morse occupies, that morning?
A. I do not remember.
Q. There was one in there?
A. I do not know.
Q. There was not running water in any of the chambers?
A. No Sir.
Q. The place where Miss Lizzie had her bowl and pitcher was a little closet?
A. I do not know.
Q. Was you ever there?
A. I was in the room, but I did not notice where she kept her pitcher or anything else?
Q. After the tragedy, did you yourself empty any pails?
A. No Sir.
Q. Or see any emptied?
A. No Sir.
Q. Did you see people washing their hands around there?
A. Yes Sir.
Q. Where were they washing them?
A. In the sink.
Q. How many different people?
A. I could not tell you.
Q. Several?
A. I did not see anybody that I remember, except Dr. Dolan and Dr. Coughlan. I think I noticed them two.
Q. Dr. Coughlan?
A. I think I saw him washing his hands.
Q. Anybody else?
A. No Sir, not as I remember.
Q. Did you see anybody washing their hands up stairs?
A. No Sir, I was not up stairs.
Q. Only once when you went up, as you told me?
A. Yes Sir.

THIS ENDS VOLUME I —– SEE CONTINUATION IN SEPARATE POST FOR VOLUME II.

 
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Posted by on November 16, 2014 in Fall River, Investigations & The Trial, MA

 

Tits & Ass – Lizzie Borden Never Showed Hers

AA

Christina Ricci. Alas, sex sells. And the 4.4 million viewers who tuned in for her Lifetime Channel Lizzie bio-pic have sent programming execs into hyper-drive. The Lizzie Chronicles will delight sponsors and foster more irrevocable myth and misinformation. Combine a nubile sexual characterization of a notorious, albeit enigmatic, subject of patricide with an “Axe” and how the hell can you miss? I believe I can say with certainty the final “Chronicle” will not have anything resembling Lizzie Borden’s actual deathbed thoughts as written about in my previous post (see link in Red above).

Lizzie could act, however.  Just read her Inquest Testimony.  As for Ms. Ricci – well, read this short article.:

http://www.dailytoss.com/…/christina-ricci-news-updates-an…/.

I suppose the only people who will like the “Fall River Chronicles” will be those who hope it helps in selling their own fictional books with similar “artistic” (gag) liberties of Lizzie and those who knew her, some knuckle-dragging males, and others who enjoy the stories which air on the Lifetime Movie Channel.  (double gag).

Me, I think if you want to create fiction based on fact why not just use Fall River as a backdrop and create original, compelling characters?  Margaret Mitchell did it with the Civil War and we still adored Rhett and Scarlett.   Besides, a mini series titled “Fall River Chronicles” could be much more interesting than just Lizzie’ Borden’s story – fact or fiction. There are the mills and stratified society dissected by mill workers on the one hand and  mill owners on the other; the land swaps and swindles; the founding families; the town’s rise to the nation’s cotton production King; the immigrant labor migration, and on and on.

Oh well.  Tits and ass.  That’s what brings them in and makes sponsors smile.  :)

 
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Posted by on November 6, 2014 in Fall River, MA, Theatre & Film, TV

 

Lizzie Borden’s Dying Act of Kindness

Originally posted on Tattered Fabric: Fall River's Lizzie Borden:

Lizzie Borden died 84 years ago today.  She died at 8:30 pm on June 1, 1927  (a Wednesday) in her home in Fall River, MA.  She had been lingering all day, surrounded by her chauffeur and two servants:  Ernest Terry, Ellen Miller, and Florence Pemberton.  There were others who came to the house as well.

The Reverend Cleveland from the nearby Church of Ascension – a few doors down from Central Congregational  Church on Rock Street – would execute the wishes Lizzie had written out on March 31, 1919.   Vida Turner would come in and be instructed to sing “My Ain’ Country”, tell no one she had been there and then leave immediately.

The reporting a few days later of Lizzie’s Will was regional front page news and appeared in many newspapers across the country recounting the horrific hatchet murders of August 4, 1892, and Lizzie’s subsequent arrest, trial and…

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Posted by on November 6, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Virtual Elections (Nothing to do with Lizzie Borden)

Random-Thoughts-1

Watching CNN I get this image of future virtual elections where we don’t even go to the polls or mail in a ballot. We will leave it all up to the media and its precinct reporters, political strategists, assorted “15-minutes-of-fame” hired talking heads we’ve never seen before, animated anchors fueled by Red Bull, clever digital graphics and redundant candidate speech videos, We will be both mesmerized and seduced by the non-stop explanations of socio-geographic percentages as they relate to the red and blue states while wishing all states were just a phucking purple.

As the virtual election day progresses, we will note the heightened excitement of the cable and network news anchors as they engage in a maniacal race for calling the winner based on projections as mystifying and astonishing as the new new math. We will be further astounded by the subsequent accuracy of their “calling it” on winning candidates and ballot initiatives with only 0.2% of all voters in all precincts across the nation having voted. We will succumb to the veracity of what they are saying because, after all, they are not only seasoned political commentators but also college professors, former press secretaries, newspaper publishers, precinct organizers and people we’ve never seen or heard of before but deliver their monolog with convincing hand gestures. Men, especially, will be seduced by the rhetoric of the 20-something blonde, hard-belly Stanford graduate babe who says things like: “Just as with the 1948 election…..”, while women over 60 will just want to rip her throat out.

By the time 3:00 pm on the west coast arrives, 90% of all candidates and initiatives will have been “winner called”, and by the 5:00 pm news we can watch the losers thanking all their volunteers. We won’t even have to read the morning’s headlines to know who won or what passed – we will have learned all about it long before Sons of Anarchy airs.

Yep, virtual elections. Next development: Bio-robotical candidates with a downloadable app for virtual campaigning.

 
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Posted by on November 4, 2014 in Nothing to do with Lizzie

 

A NARROW NICHE: WHAT DRAWS US TO LIZZIE BORDEN? WHY DO WE CARE?

Originally posted on Tattered Fabric: Fall River's Lizzie Borden:

I recently read where the online publishing company that used to produce “The Hatchet” (referred to in the below post  has decided to quit producing this magazine.  The reason stated by the editor is that online magazines are diminishing in popularity and she’s decided to focus on hard copy books instead.  “The Hatchet” has never revealed its number of subscribers (which is a measure of success for any subscription publication) and I think this is the real reason for yet another failure in the varied pursuits by the editor.  As stated in the post, this is unfortunate because the content was very good.

(from 2008)

Well, first off we have to define “We” because on one end of the spectrum “We” are the hard core scholars, a relatively tiny group grounded at the epicenter of “all things Lizzie”. At the other end is a moderate percentage of the public who…

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Posted by on October 20, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Outstanding Yankee Magazine Article on Lizzie Borden House

Most excellent article with link to a 1992 Yankee Magazine feature that was superlative at the time. Very good photos as well.

http://www.yankeemagazine.com/new-england-experiences/lizzie-borden-house

 

Mrs. Ocker’s Claim to Fame: She wore “That Dress” at Lizzie Borden’s Bed & Breakfast

Dress

Lindsey Ocker in Lizzie Borden’s Bedroom

I’ve been following J. W. Ocker’s blog , “Odd Things I’ve Seen” (aka “O.T.I.S.”) since 2006 and have delighted in his subsequent literary success.  Early on I was particularly impressed with his November 2007 account of his visit to the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast/Museum. The startling revelation  of his wife (girlfriend at the time) putting on and posing in the dress displayed in Emma’s Room (they stayed in the Lizzie/Emma suite) made me a hard core fan.

I’m not going to say more about this dress or its origin, thus (hopefully) compelling the reader to actually read his long post, an endeavor most worthwhile.  I will say, however, I believe this to be the first and ONLY time any guest – male or female – had so adorned themselves and been photographed.

Some future LBB&B/Museum guest reading this may now be inspired to replicate the event.  To those so inclined I say why not be a tad more inventive and try the green dress in the John Morse Guest Room.

Dress

It is the actual dress worn by Elizabeth Montgomery in the  courtroom scenes in the ever popular 1975 made-for-tv movie, Legend of Lizzie Borden.

I’m not sure if J. W. Ocker and his girlfriend (now wife) were demonstrating a unique act of bravery or devilish disregard for museum pieces, but I do know I admire their chutzpah.  I remain in awe.  I remain a fan.  His earlier books, compendiums of all the odd things he has seen are little treasure to my collection of books.

Mr. Ocker’s excellent post on his visit to the Bed & Breakfast can be read HERE.

 

 
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Posted by on October 7, 2014 in Uncategorized

 
 
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