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LIZZIE BORDEN AND THE MONTH OF JUNE (Repost)

Lizzie Borden and the Month of June

Partial extracts from my historic timeline for the month of June follows.    It helps one gain a perspective on what influenced Lizzie Borden and the world she lived in.   Well, sort of.  One can also watch old films like Pollyanna to get a peek into the mores, customs, societal hierachy of the Victorian and Edwardian eras.

Speaking of Pollyanna, I watched it the other day and was particularly struck by its accurate depiction of the power the founding families had within their communities, including the Church.  Just as Polly Harrington (Jane Wyman)  dictated what her church minister (Karl Malden) would trumpet from the pulpit, made me wonder if the Bordens and Durfees influenced what their ministers would speak on for the Sunday sermons at the Central Congregational Church.

June 20, 1635 John Borden, wife, and two children set sail for America.
June 9, 1772 First naval battle of the Revolutionary War, British customs schooner Gaspee is burned off Rhode Island.
June 17, 1775 Battle of Bunker Hill in Boston.
June 18, 1804 Name of “Fallriver” changed to “Troy”
June 2, 1832 Caleb Blodgett (later Judge at Borden Trial) is born in Dorchester, New Hampshire.
June 12, 1836 Justin Dewey, later Judge at Borden Trial, is born.
June 26, 1838 Mary Augusta Demarest is born in NYC; later writes “My Ain Countrie”.
June 9, 1861 John W. Coughlin born; later three-term Mayor of Fall River.
June 19, 1863 Earl P. Charlton born in Chester, Conn.  (Later becomes richest man in Fall River).
June 9, 1863 Ricca Allen is born in Canada, later friend of Nance O’Neil and Lizzie Borden.
June 6, 1865 Andrew Borden, 43, marries Abby Durfee Gray, 37, (43 days before Lizzie’s 5th birthday).  Emma is 16.
June 16, 1867 Helen Leighton born in Millbridge, Maine.
June 28, 1870 Jerome C. Borden marries Emma Tetlow. (Did 10 yr old Lizzie go to wedding?)
June 19, 1874 Andrew has running water installed in the Second Street house with service from city.
June 25, 1876 General Custer and entire regiment killed at “Battle of the Little Big Horn.”
June 29, 1876 Mill #2 of the American Linen Company, foot of Ferry St., suffered fire damage in the two upper stories.
June, 1879 Spinner’s strike, major summer long strike of mill workers.
June 11, 1885 William Almy dies in Fall River.
June 17, 1885 The Statue of Liberty, a gift from France, arrives in the U.S.
June 2, 1886 President Grover Cleveland marries Frances Folsom in Blue Room of the White House.
June 15, 1887 Dedication of BMC Durfee High School.  William Lambert is first principal.
June 4, 1890 Lizzie signs her passport application for Grand Tour to Europe.
June 16, 1890 The first Madison Square Garden, designed by McKim, Mead & White, opens in New York City.
June 21, 1890 Lizzie sails on S.S. Scythia from Boston to Liverpool, England, embarking on 19 week long “Grand Tour”.
June 24, 1891 Daylight “robbery” at the Bordens.      (KP74)
May/June 1892 Andrew kills pigeons roosting in the barn.  Morse visits end of June.
June 30, 1892 Morse spends one day at Bordens; takes Butcher Davis’ daughter & Emma for a ride.            (CI 96)
June 1, 1893 Grace Hartley graduates from Fall River High School.      (FRHN 3/21/2004)
June 3, 1893 Jose Correiro arrested in Manchester case. (Jury is sequestered and does not learn of this arrest.)
June 3, 1893 Lizzie transfers to New Bedford Jail on Ash Street.
June 5-20, 1893 THE TRIAL OF LIZZIE BORDEN
June 1893 Grace Hartley graduates from Fall River High School.      (FRHN 3/21/2004)
June 5, 1893Monday Court convened at 11:28 am.  111 questioned before the 12 jurymen are were selected.  Charles I. Richards chosen as jury Foreman.
June 6, 1893 Tuesday Indictment is read; William Moody opens for the Prosecution.  Lizzie faints and is revived.
June 6, 1893 Tuesday Civil Engr. Thomas Kieran called, gives measurements, testifies a man could have hid in front entry closet.
June 6, 1893 Tuesday Jurors travel to Fall River; visit Kelly’s house, Wade’s store, Crowe’s stone yard, Chagnon’s house, Kirby’s yard, Alice Russell’s house, Gorman’s store, Clegg’s store and banks.  Tour finished at 4:00 pm.
June 6, 1893Tuesday Jurors taken to Mellen House, Franklin & North Main Street where they spend the night.
June 7, 1893 Wednesday James A. Walsh, photographer testifies as to the accuracy of the pictures he had made of the victims and the house on the day of the killing.
June 7, 1893 Wednesday John Vinnicum Morse examination conducted by Moody, not different from that as in the Preliminary Hearing.  Lizzie smiled as her uncle tried to calculate her age and shook her head vigorously when he stated she was “33.”   (She was only 6 weeks shy of 33),
June 7, 1893 Wednesday Abraham G. Hart, Treasurer of Union Savings Bank, testifies as to Borden’s movements on morning of the 8/4.
June 7, 1893 Edwin Booth, brother of John Wilkes Booth, dies.  Had home in Middletown, RI.
June 9,  893Friday John Minnehan, patrolman assigned to follow John Morse on August 5, 1892, dies at age 48 in Fall River.
June 12, 1893 Monday Lizzie’s Inquest Testimony ruled inadmissible.
June 13, 1893 Tuesday AG Pillsbury arrives by train from Boston, consults with Knowlton & Moody & returns same evening.
June 14, 1893 Wednesday John T. Burrill, Cashier of  Union National Bank, Everett M. Cook, Cashier of the First National Bank, Jonathan Clegg, a hat dealer, Joseph Shortsleeves, a carpenter, and John Maher, a carpenter give testimony as to Andrew’s movements August 4th.
June 14, 1893 Judges ruling excludes Eli Bence’s prussic acid testimony .
June 14, 1893 At Knowlton’s request during Dr. Draper’s testimony, Dr. Dolan brings in the skulls of Andrew & Abby. Lizzie is allowed to retire from the courtroom.                                (TT1046)
June 14, 1893 Wednesday 9th Day: C. C. Potter’s son (Freddy) finds hatchet w/gilt on roof of Crowe’s barn.  Carpenter Carl McDonnel claims it is his hatchet; prussic acid testimony (Eli Bence) ruled inadmissible.
June 15, 1893 FR Evening News reports hatchet found on roof of John Crowe’s barn.                           ( FREN18)
June 15, 1893 Wednesday Opening statements by Defense are given by Andrew Jennings.
June 16, 1893 Wednesday Emma Borden testifies.
June 16, 1893 Governor Robinson reads from Bridget’s Inquest Testimony (a missing document)                (TT)
June 17, 1893 Carpenter McDonald claims Crowe’s roof hatchet is his.   (FRHN)
June 18, 1893 Carrie Poole, Lizzie’s friend residing 20 Madison Street, New Bedford, dies.
June 19, 1893 Wednesday Governor Robinson gives closing arguments; Knowlton begins his closing.
June 20, 1893 3:24 pm 13th Day: The Jury retires to deliberate.
4:32 pm Lizzie Borden pronounced “Not Guilty” at 4:35 pm.                                         (TT1928)
8:15 pm Lizzie & Emma arrive by coach w/Mrs. Holmes at 67 Pine St. in FR; small reception follows.  Lizzie spends night there.  Large crowd gathered at 92 Second St.                             (CaseBook228)
June 22, 1893 Reupholstered sofa is delivered back to the house on Second Street.                                                                         (LR1111-112)
June 23, 1893 Lizzie visits the Wm. Covel’s in Newport, RI, has classic picture of her “standing behind the chair” taken.
June 23, 1893 Morse attempts to get mileage reimbursement from Iowa to New Bedford from Co. Treasurer.                                                (FRHN)
June 27, 1893 Lizzie & Emma go to Taunton to visit Sheriff Wright’s wife.
June 4, 1900 Mary Howe (Baker) is born, daughter of Grace and Louis Howe.
June 5, 1905 Newspaper article states Lizzie writing play for Nance O’Neil.                      (Spiering p208)
June 5, 1905 Boston Globe reports Emma moving out of “Maplecroft”.
June 21, 1905 Bridget Sullivan marries John M. Sullivan in Anaconda, MT.
June 2, 1906 Emma Borden departs on White Star liner RMS Cymric, departing from Boston for Queenstown & Liverpool, enroute to Scotland.
June 30, 1908 Lizzie writes to Asst. Supt R. I. Hospital re her maid Hannah B. Nelson.                                             (Gateway Mag. Summer 1997)
June 15, 1909 Marshal Hilliard retires.
June 19, 1911 Opening Day of Fall River’s Cotton Centennial
June 23, 1911 President Howard Taft arrives in Fall River for Cotton Centennial celebration.
June 10, 1912 Grisly axe murders of 2 adults and 6 children, all while they sleep, in Villisca, Iowa.
June 25, 1914 Animal Rescue League of Fall River established as a corporation (Later becomes Faxon Animal Rescue League).
June 29, 1914 Austrian Prince, Archduke Ferdinand shot by Serbian assassin, in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, leading to World War I.
June 28, 1915 Patrick Doherty (Captain, FRPD) dies in Fall River, Mass.
June 15, 1918 Lizzie and Emma sell 230 Second St. (changed from #92)  to John W. Dunn.              (LR557)
June 19, 1919 Naval Fighting Ship commissioned “Moody” launched. William H. Moody’s sister, Mary E. Moody, sponsored the ship.
June 22, 1922 Emma Borden signs the Codicil to her Will.
June 1, 1923 Leontine Lincoln dies. (Grandfather of Victoria Lincoln and a founder of Fall River Historical Society).
June 1, 1927 Lizzie Andrew Borden dies of heart failure at 8:30 pm at her home “Maplecroft” in (59 days short of her 67th birthday).
June 4, 1927 Nance O’Neil’s interview about Lizzie appears in New Bedford Standard.
June 7, 1927 Lizzie’s Will is filed in Taunton Probate Court.
June 10, 1927 Emma Borden dies in Newmarket, New Hampshire at age 76.
June 12, 1927 Helen Leighton interview saying Lizzie was bitterly unhappy, suffered from depression.                                                  ( FRHN)
June 13, 1927 Emma Borden is buried at Oak Grove Cemetery.
June 30, 1927 Emma’s Will is filed in Taunton Probate Court.
June 3, 1939 Arthur Sherman Phillips writes to son of Defense Attorney Robinson asking to be forwarded Lizzie’s answers to the questions he posed her back in 1892.
June 23-27, 1936 Grace Hartley Howe attends Democratic Nat’l Convention in Philadelphia as a Delegate At-large.
June 14, 1955 Grace Hartley Howe, Lizzie’s cousin and legatee, dies at the age of 80 in Fall River.         (FRHN)
June 1, 1961 Adelaide Churchill home destroyed by fire.              (LR44)
June 13, 1981 Author Victoria Lincoln Lowe dies at age 76.  Her body given to Science at John Hopkins University.
June 22, 1994 Josephine Vohnoutka McGinn (wife of John) dies in Fall River.
June 1, 2001 Jules Ryckebusch retires from Bristol Community College and names Gabriela Schalow Adler Publisher of The Lizzie Borden Quarterly.
June 2, 2004 Robert Dube files for variance to convert garage to single family residence on Maplecroft property.
June 7, 2004 FR Herald News reports 92 Second Street purchased by Donald Woods of Portsmouth, RI.; says he will tear down “Leary Press”, increase parking & rebuild the barn.
June, 2008 Lizzie Borden Took an Axe, or Did She? – A Rhetorical Inquiry by Annette Holba is published.
June, 2008 Leonard Pickel announces he will open a Lizzie Borden Gift Shop & “Museum” in Salem, MA.
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4 responses to “Lizzie Borden and the Month of June

  1. Beverly Patt

    February 13, 2014 at 2:31 PM

    “June 18, 1804 – Name of “Fallriver” changed to “Troy”
    Is this a mistake? Did you mean the opposite?
    Or was it changed back at some point not noted in the timeline?

    • phayemuss

      February 14, 2014 at 6:09 PM

      No, it was “Fallriver” (ONE WORD RUN TOGETHER), then changed to to Troy then changed to Fall River.

  2. phayemuss

    June 10, 2015 at 9:58 AM

  3. Charlotte Gerber, Author

    June 11, 2015 at 8:49 AM

    Reblogged this on Charlotte Gerber and commented:
    For fellow Lizzie Borden story enthusiasts…

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Posted by on June 8, 2018 in Timeline

 

Come On In And Spend The Night at Maplecroft

 

 

And so it begins….

Check out this video HERE.

 
 

Could Edmund Pearson Have Hastened Lizzie Borden’s Death?

(I originally wrote this post back in 2010)

Edmund Lester Pearson (1880-1937)

 

Edmund Lester Pearson

He was a noted librarian and prolific writer on true crime.  In 1924 he began a correspondence with Frank W. Knowlton, son of Hosea Knowlton, the district attorney who prosecuted Lizzie Borden in her 1893 trial.   Known as the “Knowlton-Pearson Correspondence” it is a remarkable assemblage – rich in content it clearly shows the eagerness with which Frank accommodated Edmund’s request.  They were contemporaries, and Frank provided the author with “open sesame” to Lizzie’s contemporaries and others still living who knew her and/or were involved in the case.   Pearson had access to all of Hosea Knowlton’s papers on the case, and also the preliminary hearing and Trial transcript. (Knowlton was unsuccessful, however, in tracking down Bridget Sullivan’s inquest testimony – a document still missing after all these decades).

In any event, Pearson’s investigative research resulted in Studies in Murder, first published in 1924, three years before Lizzie’s death.  The book was a series of essays on notable cases, the first and expanded essay was on the Borden case.  This would be the first of many writings in subsequent books by Pearson on Fall River’s most notorious citizen.  But this first book was published while Lizzie still lived.

It is fairly certain that Lizzie Borden had read the very first book on the case published in 1893:  Fall River Tragedy by Edward H. Porter.  I think it further fairly certain she had read Studies in Murder. In the twilight of her years she was at least relieved of the awful annual editorials in the Fall River Globe commemorating the infamous crimes with their consistent innuendos that she had gotten away with the double murders.

Her life had been lived quietly and with the refinement and deportment that were her hallmarks of character.  Her closest associates were her servants and a few loyal friends and relatives.  But now came this publication.  It must have been the talk of the town when it came out.  Knowledge of Pearson’s meetings and inquiries with Lizzie’s contemporaries had proceeded the book itself, and those that assisted Pearson must have discussed it with their own associates.  Perhaps it had been talked about in hushed circles long before its publication and perhaps Lizzie had heard as well through reports of who was talking to whom.  The long essay left no doubt in the minds of the reader that the deed must have been done by Lizzie and only Lizzie.

Think for a moment how this must have affected her.  Guilty or innocent, it must have been a devastating event to have this book circulating in Fall River, the region and all over the country, stirring up painful memories of a horrible time while also serving to provide  interest to a whole new generation.   Lizzie had been described as nervous and depressed, unhappy with her decision to have lived all the rest of her life in Fall River – and now, this.

Could the book have hastened her demise?  Stress, nervous anxiety, depression.  Lizzie had always wanted to be accepted by her peers.  She lived her life kind to others and animals, generously giving and always thoughtful of the needs of others.  And now, this.   It must have played upon her mind and heart, a heart already long burdened and weakened by worry.    Not long after the book’s success and wide readership, Lizzie would be hospitalized for gall bladder surgery and never fully recover.

Hosea Morrill Knowlton

 

Knowlton, Hosea M., white, b. May 1847, 53 yr., b. Maine
Sylvia B. Wife, Jan. 1850, b. Mass.
John W. son, March 1874, 26 b. Mass.
Abby A. dau, mar. 1876, 24, mass.
Frank W., son Aug 1878, 22, Mass.
Edward A., son April 1883, 17, b. mas.
Helen S., dau. Aug. 1884, 14, b. mass.
Sylvia P, dau. may 1890, 10, Mass.
Benjamin H., son, Jun 1892, 8 yr, b. mass.

SYLVIA BASSETT, b. New Bedford, MA, 20 Jan 1852; d. Watertown, MA, 31 Mar 1937; m. New Bedford, 22 May 1873, HOSEA MORRILL KNOWLTON, b. Durham, ME, 20 May 1847; d. Marion, MA, 18 Dec 1902; son of Isaac Case and Mary Smith (Wellington) Knowlton.

Their children, all born in New Bedford were:

John Wellington Knowlton born February 28, 1874.
Abby Almy Knowlton born March 30, 1876
Frank Warren Knowlton born August 1, 1878
Edward Allen Knowlton born April16, 1883

The younger siblings were:

Helen Sophia Knowlton; August 1, 1885
August I. Knowlton;
Sylvia Prescott Knowlton born Ma7 29, 1890
Benjamin Almy Knowlton born June 13, 1892

Frank Warren Knowlton


Attorney General Herbert Parker is not only included in this correspondence but was also one of Pearson’s primary sources for his last essay in his book, Studies in Murder, titled “The Hunting Knife” concerning Mabel Page.

Herbert Parker, a very handsome man

Frank Warren Knowlton, Jr. donated his grandfather’s papers to the Fall River Historical Society in 1989.  (He died in October 11, 2002).

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Maplecroft Update: Updated Details & Code Requirements

 

Here’s an awesome article in the Fall River Herald  News with lots of new photos.

Also take note of the short video showing Manager, Ryan Woods.    Click HERE

and HERE

You won’t find short cuts on expenditures here –  but that is the way of owner Donald Woods.  He has spared no expense in his updates and maintenance  to the Lizzie Borden Bed and Breakfast Museum either.  And THAT prime Fall River tourist attraction has been exceptionally well managed for the past 14 years by Lee-ann Wilber.

The two Maple trees removed mentioned in the article create more enhanced spring and summer site lines for the easterly neighbors who remain vigilantly perched to criticize and spread misinformation.

Some photos have been shown before but click through them anyway.  A feast to the eyes..

 

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Lizzie Borden & the Dutiful Escort

Tattered Fabric: Fall River's Lizzie Borden

Copy of 1892-1Lizzie Borden circa 1890

(Note: this image has not been photo-shopped by a  50 year old, financially strapped, unemployed spinster in Fall River).

1057152123313_MA_Fall_River_Cen_Cong_ChCentral Congregational Church

In various interviews at the time of the murders, Lizzie Borden had been described as “odd” by some who knew her.    During her younger years it has been said by Michael Martins, Curator of the Fall River Historical Society, she did not have the proper dresses to attend the elegant grand parties up on “the Hill”.  But it is now known Lizzie did attend some parties – according to the private journal of an old school chum of Lizzie’s – owned by an elderly descendant who is still living in Fall River.   However, there is nothing on record, as yet, of Lizzie ever having a boyfriend or romance during her teens and early twenties.  I suspect her alleged moodiness and being “odd” was…

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Posted by on April 20, 2018 in Uncategorized

 

Maplecroft Opening Delayed

 

It’s been a harsh winter for Fall River.   Severe snow storms have prevented new owner, Donald Woods (also owns the Lizzie Borden Bed & Breakfast) from proceeding with electrical and plumbing repairs and upgrades for an early April opening.

Read HERE.

Be sure to click thru the many interior photos by Dave Souza of the Fall River Herald News and previous articles written by that intrepid “all things Lizzie,” reporter, Deborah Allard – all of which will bring you up to date.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Newspaper Reports When Lizzie and Emma Purchased “Maplecroft”

Tattered Fabric: Fall River's Lizzie Borden

maplecroftpenink1“Maplecroft” as it looked when Lizzie purchased it – showing shutters

Lizzie Borden was pronounced “Not Guilty” on June 20, 1893.  In less than two weeks, she and Emma were looking for a home “on the Hill” to purchase.  Within 3 weeks they had bought one, and less than a month later, they took possession.

The French Street home was not the first they considered, and when they did purchase #7 French Street, on August 10, 1893, they became the 3rd owner of the property.

July 1st  – less than 2 weeks after her acquittal this report on the Alfred Butterworth estate – neighbors weren’t happy with the prospect.  (Click on images for larger view and use “magnifying glass” feature).

ScannedImage-4

On July 6th came this report:

ScannedImage-5

Five days later – July 11th, the first report of the sale

ScannedImage-3

The next day – this report – The property sold for close…

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Posted by on March 21, 2018 in Uncategorized